Detroit’s Domestic Abuse Trailer Is A Hackneyed Farce

A new trailer for Quantic Dream’s Detroit: Become Human landed recently as part of Paris Games Week and it’s caused quite a kerfuffle.

The video portrays domestic abuse and details how you can make choices in the game (while waggling a controller) to stop a violent father beating the shit out of his daughter.

So yes, quite the kerfuffle indeed as I’m sure you can imagine.

Let me preface the rest of what I’m about to say by emphatically stating that I believe videogames have the potential – and deserve the freedom – to explore dark themes outside of simply gunning down soldiers and fighting off monsters. Tackling grounded, potentially traumatic, real-life scenarios in games is possible, and the pursuit can even be admirable.

I fully support an art medium that wants to put on its adult pants and examine horrors closer to home, horrors that may very well brush up against experiences the players themselves have had.

David Cage, self-styled autere, is not the man for the job.

By his own styling, Cage is the sole creative force behind his projects, and as such takes defacto credit for Quantic Dream’s content. Unfortunately for David Cage, his most famous contribution to the literary side of gaming has been a single name – Jason.

Relentlessly parodied, the repeated yelling of “Jason” in Heavy Rain is the most famous piece of dialog David Cage has ever written. To quote anything else would be difficult, as Cage hasn’t written anything else particularly memorable… except maybe another name – Shaun.

When the word “Jason” is your biggest contribution to videogame writing, perhaps you’re not quite the Kubrick you think you are.

Cage has fantastic ideas. He is a passionate creator, fiercely committed to doing things outside the realm of traditional “AAA” games, and I applaud him for that. As with any other Quantic Dream game, I’m looking forward to Detroit. Seriously, I’m eager to see it in the flesh.

Despite Quantic impressing me less with each new and increasingly garbled release, I’m still forever intrigued by the work they do.

The game industry is better for having David Cage in it, but his games are worse for having nobody around telling David Cage what not to do.

Case in point – David Cage’s cringeworthy idea of what domestic abuse looks like.

In an interview with Eurogamer, a defensive “autere” stood by his decision to portray domestic abuse the way he did, going so far as to claim he didn’t even choose the subject – the subject chose him.

“You don’t choose to talk about domestic abuse,” he claimed. “It’s not like I was like ‘oh, let’s write a scene about domestic abuse’. It’s not how it works.”

Cage said he was “working on something important, something meaningful and something moving,” with this particular sequence from Detroit.

The problem with that statement it’s horseshit.

First of all, obviously Cage chose to talk about it. Nobody forced his hand, we wasn’t possessed by the spirit of Polyhymnia. When you write a story, you are making conscious decisions about the story you’re writing, the characters you’re using, and the events that WHY THE FUCK AM I HAVING TO EXPLAIN HOW CHOICES AND ACTIONS ARE RELATED!?

But more to the point of why Cage’s claims of meaning and importance are rubbish…

Detroit‘s portrayal of domestic abuse is clumsy, cringeworthy, and – in typical Cage fashion – poorly written.

My history of living with domestic abuse is well known. Growing up, I saw and heard things a child shouldn’t have to see and hear. Things David Cage, apparently, cannot hope to effectively show an audience.

This shit is not like those melodramatic made-for-TV movies with cartoonish abusers and overtly choreographed violence that borders on action sequences. Such woefully outdated farce, however, is what Detroit gladly indulges in.

At best, the footage we’ve seen of the game just barely matches those aforementioned TV dramas in terms of writing, direction, and acting.

David Cage’s “important, meaningful, moving” work is, in actuality, a caricature of domestic abuse, and far from an original one. It is not powerful in the sense that I found it relatable, distressing, or even provocative. It’s powerful in the sense that it showcases just how ill-equipped Cage is to handle mature subjects.

This is certainly a subject too mature for his creative ability.

Had I been the one interviewing David for Eurogamer, the first question I’d have asked is if he drew from personal experience when writing that scene, or if he simply copied films again.

I cannot claim to know of David Cage’s personal life, but his predilection for copying things he’s seen in movies and mangling them in the process is pretty evident. Perhaps in this case, he is correct when he says he doesn’t choose his subjects – not when he can let Lionsgate make the choices for him.

I’m sure some of you will believe I’m writing this due to being offended, but I’m writing this because I felt little at all while I was in the process of watching that trailer. In any other medium, this is the same typical hokey bullshit I’ve seen a dozen times, but because it’s videogames, Quantic Dream yet again gets away with looking edgy and innovative.

To someone who’s seen abuse up close and personal, a cartoon version of an angry dad yelling exposition and throwing a table while increasingly taking on the voice of a drunken clown is almost funny. Almost.

Compared to the reality, this farcical bumbling is nothing. I felt no menace from Bunkem the Clown shouting mangled garbage. I felt no fear for the lifeless characters he was threatening. All I felt was the aura of a cynically produced trailer just provocative enough to spark conversation in the gaming community while remaining hackneyed trite nonsense outside of it.

Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus also features scenes of domestic violence, ones that hit even closer to home. While still heavy handed, there was just enough subtlety going on that a real sense of menace became palpable. There were things happening that authentically distressed me, because I’d been there.

Scenes in Wolfenstein II really did get to me – hell, it bordered on genuinely offending me. Yet I’m not here criticizing those scenes. They weren’t used in trailers to hype up the release and get people talking. They weren’t so poorly scripted as to almost provide a comical portrayal.

“Would you ask this question to a film director, or to a writer? Would you?”

That was David Cage’s response when asked about his decisions to put domestic violence in Detroit.

Leaving aside the humor in him failing to class himself as a writer, I think this question of his exposes the problem David has had his entire career – he knows what movies and literature have accomplished, he knows games could accomplish the same, but he simply is not gifted enough to do it. Not on his own. Not as the “autere” his claims to be.

If you want to handle subject matter of this nature, you need subtlety, tact, and an ability to build tension. The man whose best work is about the Internet coming to life and trying to enslave humans just ain’t the man to do it justice. The man whose character arcs are so poorly developed, he uses time skips to avoid writing any development isn’t adequate enough for the task.

He should stick to jealous ghosts and rogue AI conspiracies. Reality is just too real for David Cage to handle.

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99 Comments on "Detroit’s Domestic Abuse Trailer Is A Hackneyed Farce"

Chirpes
Member
Chirpes
I’ve never seen domestic violence in any media really, nor have experienced such a thing first-hand; it’s typically a story arc I avoid in any media and as a result the trailer did grip me. It wasn’t cringey for me because I have no frame of reference for it, like I assume a majority of people, I would like to hope at least. It did get me hyped and excited for a game I had no interest in prior by a game designer I didn’t care about. That said, however, I do agree it should not have been a trailer… Read more »
Vibri
Member
Vibri

So are you saying Wolfensteins abuse cutscenes are bad because they are so realistic and impactful?
Surely that is the point of such scenes?
I don’t really see how they could offend someone

Terry-Osaurusus Hex XI
Member

How did you extract that from this article?

Nitrium
Member
Nitrium

“Scenes in Wolfenstein II really did get to me – hell, it bordered on genuinely offending me. Yet I’m not here criticizing those scenes. They weren’t used in trailers to hype up the release and get people talking. They weren’t so poorly scripted as to almost provide a comical portrayal.”

I don’t think you’re quite getting the context of the word “offending” in Jim’s sentence. It’s very clearly being used in a good way – i.e. impactful.

Gorantharon
Member
Gorantharon

If it wasn’t so stupidly over- and misused by now, “triggering” might be another way to put how strongly these scenes can affect someone, because there are parts of how the dad acts and talks that hit very close to reality.

Snowskeeper
Member

I didn’t get the sense that it was being used in a good way. From what I could tell, he still found Wolfenstein’s domestic abuse scenes heavy-handed and bumbling, but because they had at least some subtlety, they actually had an effect on him. David Cage’s portrayal was so far from the reality that it had no impact whatsoever, positive or negative.

ewingsquadron
Member
ewingsquadron
I know you chose that last image to probably mock David Cage, but that’s exactly the moment I became a fan. I was totally charmed that some average guy was giving me this behind the scenes DVD style intro to his video game. What sealed the deal was seeing The Dark Sorcerer tech demo at E3. I had to ask the Quantic Dream engineer if Cage actually did write it, because it was so damn funny. As it stands, David Cage games are like late night TNT movies, a la Air Force One or The Negotiator. Sure, they get some… Read more »
Sabriella
Member
Sabriella
I think the biggest issue with depictions like this is, is how it becomes unclear to people what abuse actually looks like. I was well into my 20es before I realized that my childhood home had been physically, mentally and emotionally abusive. Why? Because my dad didn’t take off his belt and beat me. My mum didn’t drink herself blind and throw bottles around. In other words, the abuse did not look like abuse looks on TV. And now, apparently, not like it looks in games either. I gotta say, though, there’s a slight bit of me feeling offended at… Read more »
Pilkington
Member
Pilkington

There are few genuinely interesting and well-executed moments in QD games, the very first scene of Fahrenheit comes to mind, it’s just that Cage shits the bed when it comes to executing the plot of his games. I feel like he only places sex scenes and domestic scenes in his games just to go “Look at how mature my game is, my game is a narrative work of art because sex and adults do sex sometimes, emotions. Look at the emotions. Care, people, care.”

DaisyMaisy
Guest
DaisyMaisy
– cw: sexual assault, abuse, spoilers for Beyond: Two Souls – – – – – This whole thing really reminded me of something that really upset me in Beyond Two Souls but not many people seemed to be talking about. There are two attempted rape scenes of the protagonist in the game, one when Jodie is a teenager and is attacked by three adult men in a bar and one when she’s a homeless adult and is assaulted after nearly giving a man a blowjob for cash. The scenes feel unnecessary and exploitative and have nearly no consequences aside from… Read more »
Chris
Member

Any chance we can get a block or ignore feature like disqus had? Or maybe just limit how many times someone can spam comments in a very short time?

Not asking for any specific reason, just on my mind in this thread for some reason.

Anton
Member
Anton

I’d also like to know.

drownedsummer
Member
drownedsummer

Implementation of that would be nice.

drownedsummer
Member
drownedsummer

A potential 50% upgrade.

Anton
Member
Anton

Well, 33/80, so like 41% upgrade at best XD

drownedsummer
Member
drownedsummer

I got my figures than factored in inflation.

Chris
Member

The highest it got yesterday was 33 out of 71, which was about 46%. You guys bumped it down a bit with these posts 😛

drownedsummer
Member
drownedsummer

The mass downvoting from a deleted account has started.

Imp Emissary
Member

It really is too easy to abuse. May need to patch the hole.
:/….What?

The Worst Elephant
Member
The Worst Elephant

Jeeze, yes, these forums are verging on unusable because of this.

George
Member
Victimization of people is a level of evil that I think video games have difficulty dealing with. Not to say that they shouldn’t try or that it is impossible but rather that the interactivity causes a lot of pitfalls. I have criticized Wolfenstein II ad nauseam on this site for what I see as deeply problematic depictions of violence made worse by the narrative established by the opening scene. But it’s domestic violence wasn’t hackneyed (at least at first). The main problem is that how does a game examine victimization without indulging the player’s sadism? Or turning the player into… Read more »
Greene Scott
Member
Greene Scott
They made Kitty Pryde vs Green Goblin boring. This really feels like a case where having more creative people who know the subject more could have been so useful. I can’t stand auteur theory, part of it being me being a up and coming screenwriter and seen someone else take credit for my ideas and the the toxic and awful things it can result in the film industry such as Directors thinking that their films causing layoff and VFX studios closing is something to gloat about, works like Star Trek the motion picture and the Phantom Menace being created by… Read more »
buttz
Member
buttz

auteur, i believe

Kirk Hammer
Member
Kirk Hammer
I think what’s most infuriating about Cage is that he completely embodies that smug auteur stereotype – a man absolutely convinced that he’s a genius, and as such his vision is unimpeachable. It genuinely wouldn’t have occurred to him that putting a hamfisted “domestic abuse level” in his game would lead to anything else than him being heralded as a visionary. Hence his complete umbrage at having some mere videogame news outlet question *him*, a visionary, and his response that’s basically “No no, shush, can’t you see I’m making ART?” For all the praise he gets for his “games” I’ve… Read more »
Shaded Spriter
Member

I was looking forward to this game before reading that interview. Cage could of done something entertainingly b-grade cyberpunk but he had to cage it up. I have not grown up with domestic abuse but I think it has been portrayed well in games. LISA comes to mind with the ending…more so because you can not stop it happening.

Arella Jardin
Member
Arella Jardin

My initial reaction to Detroit was great interest… until I saw it was a Quantic Dream game. My mood immediately deflated. An exciting premise, likely to be ruined in its execution by who created it. It’s like having the perfect sandwich, then David Cage sneezes on it.

I had the same reaction to Elex. Super cool sci fi Fantasy mashup. Then I found out the makers of Risen developed it. Lost all interest.

Alt+Doom
Member

Maybe the team at Ninja Theory should give me a hand.

Benj
Member
Benj
The saddest thing is that games are a really good medium for showing the powerlessness, guilt and degradation that’s caused by domestic abuse. This can even work well with David Cage’s chosen quicktime event style gameplay. The dad character out of nowhere swings a punch at you with a quick time event “dodge”: If you press it in time he stops mid punch and says “look kid, you can’t just flinch like that. You need to learn to stand up for yourself because there’s some really bad people out there who’ll eat you alive. Why don’t you stand up for… Read more »
Kirk Hammer
Member
Kirk Hammer
Or perhaps the child’s eating dinner with his father, who growls at him “Stop scraping your knife on the plate” and you slowly, carefully have to do one of those extended “hold down one button, then another, then another” QTEs as you eat. Each time you slip up (and the game might throw curveballs at you like unexpected button prompts) he gets angrier and angrier, and the game might startle you or distract you to hammer home the unfairness of the situation. The fact that both of us thought of our own much better ways to do a scene like… Read more »
Galactix100
Member

One of the things I liked in the Wolfenstein 2 intro was the part where you throw stuff at BJ’s dad. It had no effect on him and then when you run out of stuff to throw you’re left thinking ‘shit, what now?’. It did a really good job of conveying a sense of powerlessness in the face of such people and behaviour.
Then the game fucked it and turned BJ’s dad into a fucking cartoon villain.

Anton
Member
Anton

*Slight spoilers* They actually salvage it a little bit and give you more flashbacks later on, in which they humanize BJ’s dad just the tiniest bit. It does wonders to offset the cartoon villain characterization, and makes the overall backstory that much sadder.

TheIntern
Member
TheIntern
‘Ow many emoshuns is memes? I don’t respect David Cage. What he’s trying to do might be admirable, but his ego is selling shit his talent can’t produce. That taints the niche he’s in, making it increasingly harder for other, likely more talented and humble creators to get their work noticed. It’s kind of a reverse Steam Greenlight situation; instead of a ton of hack developers over-saturating the market so the good stuff can’t be found, we have one hack developer making himself so infamous that people use him as the standard for the genre. It took an insane level… Read more »
Isaactfa
Member
Isaactfa

Because luckily I never had to experience abuse of any kind really, I would be so interested in playing an authentic game depicting that kind of atrocity. This should be where video games set themselves apart, where you can make someone experience something from such a personal point of view, while still in a safe environment. I hope that’s not offensive.

chapomon
Member

I would have to agree with you, Jim; aside from the android, this scene offers nothing new and everything that’s in that trailer is pretty trite and predictable. Still looking forward to Detroit but I’m not expecting a master piece, at least not in the way David Cage is expecting.

A request though, have Laura off screen ask questions from that interview and read David Cage’s responds in your David Cage voice with the cut out mask. Pretty please? 🙂

Galactix100
Member

I’ve never understood people who treat Quantic Dream games as anything more than fascinating little oddities filled with squandered potential. I especially don’t get the people who think Cage is a good writer. I know videogames (other than a select few) usually aren’t good at actual story and characters (world-building/lore doesn’t count) but how anyone can think Cages efforts are anything beyond laughable.

Oni Squirrel
Member
Oni Squirrel

I enjoy Cage’s first two games. Farenheit/Indigo Prophecy and Heavy Rain, and I think Quantic Dream potentially makes some interesting experiences. But for me Cage’s ego hampers my ability to enjoy his games.

Beyond was the game that broke me on that. Leading up to release the way Cage talked about the game wrecked my view of the game and him.

QD games are interesting experiences. But Cage constantly acting like he is creating transcendental pieces of fiction wrecks what qualify as popcorn games to me.

drownedsummer
Member
drownedsummer

Omikron I believe was his first game, which never tends to get mentioned in discussions of his writing.

Chris
Member
I don’t think Omikron was very widely played, I had honestly never heard of it until people were talking about it after David Bowie passed away. It has a lot of the problems of later Cage games with pretending your choices matter then erasing them and with the plot going in nonsensical directions and introducing more and more elements, but it’s also a pretty overt sci-fi setting from the start and so it doesn’t have the specific problem that an Indigo Prophecy or a Beyond can have of luring people in with what looks like a realistic setting and then… Read more »
drownedsummer
Member
drownedsummer

I’ve never played it and I entirely forgot to grab it to honor Bowie’s passing. The setting being a less realistic one most likely mitigates the commentary on the writing of that one. I was aware of it back it was first released but I suspect more due to Bowie’s involvement.

Benj
Member
Benj

I think that video game writing is inherently harder than writing for other mediums.

The plot has to allow for players to be constantly succeeding and the dialogue has to fight with the fact that players are impatient to move on to the next bit of gameplay.

David Cage kind of cheats by just making a film with cut scenes in it. The writing might seem better than average games to some people when actually he’s just dodged the challenges inherent to the structure of other types of games.

Galactix100
Member

A brilliant example is all of the Simon says stuff in Fahrenheit. Has fuck all to do with anything most of the time, it’s just there because it’s a videogame and needs gameplay.

drownedsummer
Member
drownedsummer

This is the trap that many games like this fall into that they feel the need to remind people they are playing a game. Life Is Strange has a good narrative, a strong story with developed characters. Unfortunately it has very clear issues with pacing and those are moments when DontNod has to remind us we are playing a game and brings to a sudden halt. Episode two is perhaps the worst point for this with the junkyard scene being an obvious point where they felt the need to invent a reason for the player to explore the area.

MetalGearSqualid
Member
MetalGearSqualid
Don’t get the vitriol this guy receives, his games don’t deserve anything close to the ridicule they receive. They’re not for everyone but I loved Fahrenheit and thought heavy rain was pretty decent. Haven’t tried beyond two souls just because it came out around the time the PS4 was launching and there too many nice shiny looking new games to play but I’ll get round to it at some point. The interviewer from eurogamer in this case came across as a bit of a dick imo – yes he may very well ask those same questions of a writer or… Read more »
Anton
Member
Anton

He’s a hack writer who advertises his work like it’s the continuation of War and Peace. Of course, he’s free to keep hacking, but the reaction against him is entirely understandable, imo.

MetalGearSqualid
Member
MetalGearSqualid

Believe or not there are actually people who enjoy his games.

Edit. Hack writer or not, he’s doing something right surely if he has an audience who enjoy his output?

Anton
Member
Anton

Yes, and I enjoy Metal Gear Solid games. However, I can also admit that Kojima is absolutely terrible at producing decent dialogue writing, especially when it comes to the english translation. Therefore, I completely understand why people get mad when Kojima gets praised as a god of video games – he’s good, but he’s not perfect and should not be treated as such. Same goes for Cage.

Gorantharon
Member
Gorantharon

While Kojima’s dialog is atrocious, he’s often extremely smart in the details, subtext and meta areas of his story.

Ther’s really something to discover and he has something to say in his games, so handling some areas clumsily is sad, but not directly ruining it.

Cage, to me, lives on the surface level. It’s sound and fury and when you get to the themes it’s shallow.

Chris
Member

There are people who enjoy his games, and there are people who think he’s a hack who endlessly regurgitates things he saw movies do much better because he’s so desperate to have his games be perceived as cinematic masterpieces rather than mediocre adventure games with obnoxious QTEs and weird issues with sexual violence directed at women.

Both are allowed to have their opinions, just because you like it doesn’t mean we can’t make fun of Mr Polygons Equal Emotions as he presents the completely new and original “what if humans are bad and robots are good” premise.

Shaded Spriter
Member
David Cage is a hack for this reason. Quoting him talking about the existance of the origami in Heavy Rain: “Actually, no, because this is what Hitchcock calls a MacGuffin. He said a very interesting rule is that you can only have one MacGuffin in a story. A MacGuffin is something that is not explained. And one is okay — if you have three, then that story doesn’t make any sense. But if you have something where you leave the audience space to, you know, try to understand and make up their own answers for that, that’s fine. And I… Read more »
Christoph Brinkmann
Member

“Edit. Hack writer or not, he’s doing something right surely if he has an audience who enjoy his output?”

There are people who enjoy Knack, so this isn’t going to be your strongest argument. IJS

Galactix100
Member
I don’t think the games deserve too much ridicule. If you take them as what they are they’re fun enough. Fahrenheit’s at best a B movie level quasi-supernatural… thriller I guess which is fine. The problems mainly arise due to two issues. 1) David Cage is delusional. He’s not as good a writer as he thinks he is, it’s supremely evident in all of his work. You can see what he wants to do/think he is done and it’s obvious how far short of that he falls. 2) David Cage clearly writes the story first as though it’s a film/tv… Read more »
Kirk Hammer
Member
Kirk Hammer
Do yourself a favour – if you enjoyed Heavy Rain in particular, don’t replay it. It’s entertaining on the first playthrough but as soon as you play it again, you notice all those bits that don’t make sense in hindsight or which are never resolved, and the segments where your “choices” ultimately don’t change the plot or are invalidated in order to fit back into the story. It’s the gameplay equivalent of “oscar bait” – all the superficial sheen and story beats to impress on that first pass for the people who give out awards and who play the game… Read more »
Christoph Brinkmann
Member

The reason he’s a hack is because of the whole “Ze polygons are emotions-zee” nonsense. That in itself is plenty of reason to call him a hack. Nevermind the fact that he makes the video game version of Oscar bait game after game after game. You like his stuff? Fine, but not everybody’s going to go for someone they perceive as being too in love with the smell of his own farts to realize he’s making everyone else in the room barf their guts out.

HaloInReverse
Member
HaloInReverse

It’s because he’s pretentious. He thinks he’s a great writer, even though he’s not. He uses cliches from movies, while inserting what he thinks American culture is like. He thinks he knows what domestic abuse is like, but all he’s really doing is copying movie and TV tropes. He’s a hack. Do I really need to reiterate what Jim has said?

You can still enjoy those games and think they’re fun, all while knowing Cage is a shit, pretentious writer.

doodger
Member
doodger

To quote Jim himself, David Cage is lucky to be judged by the standards of a game writer because Heavy Rain/Beyond/most of his portfolio would be laughed out of any serious movie festival.

Camilo-sama
Member
Camilo-sama

Jason!

Anton
Member
Anton

Still waiting on that soap opera co-written by David Cage, Hideo Kojima, and whoever writes the godawful(ly awesome) dialogue for the Resident Evil games.

Seriously though, it baffles me that he’s still taken seriously as a writer/creator. His games were considered passable back when the bar for video game storytelling was basically touching the floor, and they never really improved, aside from adding in some of the uncanniest-valley character faces and expressions.

Galactix100
Member

Have a look at the comments on the Eurogamer interview. Anything criticising Cage is subject to attempted censoring (down-voted to the point where a wee “this may be offensive ’cause of all the down-votes’ message appears instead and you have to manually choose to read it rather than it just showing up) and everything else is ‘why are you being so mean to David Cage?’ One of them was literally along the lines of ‘this isn’t an interview, it’s an interrogation’.

Anton
Member
Anton

To be fair, that interview was almost as hostile as John Walker’s treatment of Peter Molyneux. Yeah, Cage looks like he’s making another hackjob of a game, but interviews are still supposed to try for some semblance of neutrality.

Galactix100
Member

I think there’s no other way to try and get actual answers out of people like David Cage and Peter Molyneux. If you soft ball it all you’ll get is pretentious bollocks. At least this interview showed Cage as the delusional hack that he is rather than letting him masquerade as an eccentric auteur.

Anton
Member
Anton
I *want* to agree for this specific case, but in a general sense I think it’s pretty bad for the interviewer to drive the tone of the conversation. You may see it as the interview outing Cage’s BS, but other people will see it as an unprofessional reporter bullying an innocent developer. These people are actually going to be MORE sympathetic towards Cage afterwards, as the comments show. In either case, it’s not the interviewer’s job to tell the audience what to think – he needs to ask reasonably neutral questions, let the answers speak for themselves, and let the… Read more »
Galactix100
Member
I’m not sure neutrality is possible in interviews. The questions an interviewer asks are always going to be informed in someway by their views, be it the content of the questions themselves or the way they’re asked. Also I’d say the Eurogamer interviewer was fairly neutral in his questioning. The only question that wasn’t was the one accusing Cage of using domestic violence as window dressing, perhaps out of frustration since other than that it was mostly him asking Cage why he chose to write about domestic violence and Cage either trying to dodge the question or talking a load… Read more »
Anton
Member
Anton

Oh, you’re absolutely right, absolute neutrality is impossible, but there is still a difference between an interview that strives for neutrality, and one driven by inherent bias. In this particular case, that gulf was crossed exactly when the interviewer flat-out told Cage and the audience that he thought that Cage’s themes were window dressing.

I’m not gonna lie, it was satisfying to read because I’m certainly not fond of the man, but it’s not good practice.

Galactix100
Member

The window dressing thing is kind of dependent on Cage’s answer. If he’d given a proper answer that explained why he’d chosen to write about that subject instead of going ‘Well it’s about eeemoshuns but it doesn’t matter because I’m a creator and you can’t expect me to explain why I do what I do’ then it could have been a good question. It could have resulted in Cage providing an insightful perspective on his process and decision making.

Like I say though the question being good or not relies on David Cage not acting like an absolute roaster.

Imp Emissary
Member

He kind of fudged up by accidentally saying he wasn’t a writer though. :/

Imp Emissary
Member

Kind of a basic softball question really. “This thing you did. Why do this?”

Ffordesoon
Member
Ffordesoon
Strongly disagree. That interview was extraordinarily kind. The interviewer asked reasonable questions and kept his composure. Cage is the one who started freaking the fuck out and asking the guy if he’d ask the same question of a film director or writer (presumably meaning a novelist). Which is fucking hysterical, by the way. Film directors and novelists get asked about controversial scenes in their work all the time, as the interviewer points out. If you say you want to be treated as a serious artist, you can’t get mad when people treat you as a serious artist.
Imp Emissary
Member

Liquid!

Optimus Princeps Bob Boblington
Member
Optimus Princeps Bob Boblington

Out of curiosity, how did you feel about the Bloody Baron quests in The Witcher 3 and how they handled to topic?

hiyaJim
Member
hiyaJim

but jim, you forgot to mention the EMOTIONS

also fuck activision for reaching a new low with those in game lootboxes

MrMalodor
Member
MrMalodor

(Jim, I hate to be that guy but… it’s auteur, not autere)

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