The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Special Edition Review – Dragonborn Again

A sweet roll, but not the sweetest roll.

01

Developer: Bethesda
Publisher: Bethesda
Format: PC, PS4 (reviewed), Xbox One
Released: October 27, 2016
Copy provided by publisher

Five years is a long time in videogames. In that time, Bethesda has remained a critical darling but public opinion on the company as both a studio and publisher has become more divided. The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim has, itself, gone from a beloved production to one that has a loudly vocal base of detractors – especially in a post-Witcher 3 world.

Some may argue the game has not held up over the past half-decade, but while it may be dated in a technical sense (and wasn’t exactly cutting edge in its day), there’s something magnetic about it that I just can’t shake.

While it may not be the game I’ve replayed the most, it certainly holds that distinction within its genre – rare is the time I’ll ever return to a roleplaying game of this nature to try different builds and alternate story routes, but Skyrim has kept me coming back over the years. I’ve made conjurers, illusionists, armored tanks and a designed-by-committee mess… and I love it every time.

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Special Edition is little more for me than an excuse to have yet another go, and if you’re a previous fan of the game, that’s the best way to approach it – while there are definitely improvements, you’re still paying for the same old Skyrim, warts and all.

Or rather, bugs and all.

03

I needn’t go into the gameplay and story of Skyrim, though you can check my almost embarrassingly glowing review here. I stand by what I said about the original, even if I wouldn’t be quite so flowery (or lengthy) in my writing style these days.

As far as enhancements go, Skyrim has benefitted from a number of visual improvements, with art and effects getting a pleasant bit of remastering. Bethesda itself boasts about volumetric god rays, screen-space reflections, and weather shaders, though not all of this work will immediately jump out at the player.

Nevertheless, the game does look better when comparing the last base game to the new base game, even if the improvements are subtle. As someone who modded the hell out of Skyrim to enjoy superior colors, effects, and technical details, returning to a basic game does not yield quite the same results as it might if someone jumped from a last-gen console version to the PS4/XBO edition.

There are downsides to the visual improvements, ones common to remastered versions of older games – the higher resolution and visual cleanup does not flatter the original character and object models. Getting right in the face of an NPC often reveals an unimpressive countenance, flat and lacking in crucial detail.

It’s a classic drawback to remastering – sometimes you just provide a better lens through which to see how dated things look.

02

Of course, Skyrim Special Edition includes all of the downloadable content previously released, providing DawnguardHearthfire, and Dragonborn. Delivering some of the more interesting stories and items, they’re worth digging into if you only ever played the basic game, giving you a pretty little home, some vampiric action, and a trip to Morrowind all as part of the base package.

More interesting – though only for the console customers – is mod support for both the Xbox One and PlayStation 4. Unfortunately, while Sony relented on its previous mod embargo, the withdrawal comes with caveats.

Unlike the Xbox One version, the PlayStation 4 copy I was provided with only allows mods that use in-game assets, meaning truly inventive work or improvements will not be available. At launch, the difference between the two versions’ mod support was damning – there were only 38 mods to browse on PS4 compared to the XBO’s 119.

Having experienced how far mods can go on Xbox One with Fallout 4, it’s disappointing to see the frankly pathetic offering on Sony’s console. There are still some useful mods but they mostly consist of the boringly practical kind – no Jason Voorhees costumes or content from other Bethesda properties, more simple tweaks to the gameplay and NPCs or new locations built from pre-existing content.

Though not as inferior as it would have been with zero mod support, Sony’s restrictions have undoubtedly made Skyrim Special Edition a less complete game that I could only recommend you ignore in favor of the alternatives – if alternatives are an option for you.

Again, my review copy was a PS4 version and my assessment will reflect this – still a good game, but not what it should be.

04

On PC, however, Special Edition shouldn’t be passed up. It’s free to anybody who owns the base game and DLC (or the Legendary Edition), so if you’re eligible, you’ll be getting a decent upgrade for nothing.

[Correction: the free upgrade was an extremely limited-time offer. If you did not get it by October 28, you can’t get it. Apologies for that!]

By far the biggest bone I have to pick with this dovahkiin-flavored rerelease is that, even five years later, well-known and cataloged glitches remain.

Bethesda enjoys a privileged level of forgiveness for the bugs in its games – I’m not exempt from offering that forgiveness – thanks in part to hype, but also to Bethesda’s entertaining worlds and ambitious sprawls. However, this is a five-year-old game and in that time it would be nice to see at least some nefarious problems fixed.

It took hardly any time at all for me to find a miscellaneous quest I couldn’t complete because the correct dialog wouldn’t appear. I Googled the issue and there it was, an old bug that has been talked about dozens of times. Something like that should be resolved, and it isn’t. In fact, while Bethesda boasts of the improvements made to the game, it has neglected to mention bug fixes at all.

As much as I adore the game, to the point where I gave its original release a rare full score, I’m disappointed no additional QA was performed on a game that’s always needed it. I suppose Bethesda just leaves it up to the modders now.

05

Skyrim is still a blast to play, and while I appreciate many have gone off it, or weren’t on it to begin with, there’s still an arresting quality to the world Bethesda built, a world full of individual places that feel like home.

At this point, playing The Elder Scrolls V is like putting on a comfortable old pair of sweatpants. It’s not exactly stylish, it’s frayed around the edges, it’s showing its age, and there might be a few old cumstains, but it’s warm and familiar and it just feels good to have around.

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Special Edition is that same pair of sweatpants put through the laundry.

That’s about all I have for that analogy.

7.5/10
Good

John Daniell
Guest
John Daniell

Interesting to see how Jim feels about some of his early writing. I think a lot of us can relate to the feeling of looking back at something we said years ago or the way we felt about something and feel a bit squeemish.

For example, I sometimes take a glance back at a particularly awful Fallout 3 user review on GameFAQ’s that a 17 year old me wrote because I’m a glutton for self loathing and pain.

Viking Mana
Guest
Viking Mana

Well, sadly we live in a day and age where people will happily look at something you said five years ago and use it against you, because apparently everyone thinks that opinions and beliefs are static.

Jim Sterling
Guest

I know that all too well. My tasteless past writing is used by currently tasteless people to attack me for saying things years ago they happily say today. It makes no sense, but they do it anyway.

Fortunately, I own my career history, even if some of it isn’t stuff to be proud of. I *am* proud of the work it eventually led to, and if I had to be a talentless, obnoxious, wannabe shock-jock dickhead to end up being a better person today, then that’s what had to happen.

Justin Graham
Guest
Justin Graham

I am glad that you took the time to write a new review to give your current thoughts on Skyrim. I know for other remastered games you’ve reposted older reviews with some edits, and I’ve never been particularly a fan of that approach (though it’s a valid approach, certainly). But again, this is a good write-up.

InfamousDS
Guest
InfamousDS

To be fair (Thanks Jim for the link), the old review was Jim jumping up and down and excitedly screaming “LOOK HOW AWESOME SKYRIM IS! BEHOLD IT IN ALL ITS GLORY!” with some details making up a full article scattered throughout. The positivity (Fuck You Mozilla, it’s a real word!) was almost undiluted soda syrup sweet.

It really doesn’t fit his current style, and it was far more positive than I imagine he actually feels playing the remaster. I see the “Remastered Reviews” as something he does when his opinion is unchanged or otherwise indifferent.

Viking Mana
Guest
Viking Mana

Honored to hear your take on it, and I’m glad that you agree. I wish people would be more rational, especially regarding something like videogames, but these days it seems like people are just desperate to be furious.

diamond
Guest
diamond

I wrote some not so good fanfiction stories on the website Adult Fanfiction back in 2008, i’m not ashamed of them, but i’d like to think my writing has improved since then.

John Daniell
Guest
John Daniell

That’s the spirit!

Jim Sterling
Guest
Much of my old work was terrible. Earlier Jimquisitions were shoddy and ill-conceived even if they had some raw talent. My idea of what’s funny has evolved into what I hope is something that still shocks and weirds people out but doesn’t alienate, punch down, or abuse others (except Chip). My reviews are shorter but better for it, cutting out the flowery guff and getting to the meat of the topic. There are some old gems in the shit, but I’m not sentimental about much of what I put out there. However, I’m not *ashamed* of it, per se –… Read more »
Chris
Guest
Chris

It’s like that line Yahtzee said in one of his reviews (don’t remember which one).
“90% of artists hate any of their own work that’s 5 years or older and the other 10% are LYING”

Lies That Bind
Guest
Lies That Bind

It was the half life 2 review when he was talking about how fans were making commentary about tthe update praising it.

John Daniell
Guest
John Daniell

Fu

Wolfie
Guest
Wolfie

Now that the Creation Kit has been updated, I just have to wait for SKSE to update and the mods I like to use come back on (hopefully).

A problem I always have is that old Skyrim likes to hang or just close without warning. Frequently. It’s frustrating at times. At least supposedly Skyrim SE is more stable.

John Daniell
Guest
John Daniell

There are already some great ones that have been ported! A lot of mods that were overshadowed by more heavily endorsed mods are getting the spotlight because their light/clean scripting has allowed them to be ported without SKSE.

Consider trying Ordinator, Wildcat Combat, and Imperious Races (all made by the same person).

The first one in particular is the best perk overhaul I have ever used, but the others are phenomenal too.

Wellsy487
Guest
Wellsy487

I must admit. I brought Fallout 4, loving both Skyrim and fallout 3, but I ended up getting bored of Fallout after a few hours. I’m not sure, but after playing Witcher 3, which doesn’t make you load every time you open a door, I found the way Bethesda’s RPGs were set up a chore. I loved Skyrim, and agreed with Jim’s glowing review at the time, but I feel I wouldn’t enjoy it as much again, which will keep me from buying it.

Plus, fuck this no review copies bollocks.

mada77
Guest
mada77
I generally really like your reviews but seeing “QA has apparently been asleep on the job” for an old issue is really pinning the blame on the wrong people. What likely happened with the issue you ran into is it got found and brought up by QA both in the original release and this one. In the case of the original either the phrase QA hates hearing most, “It’s not happening on my machine” came up or they simply ran out of time to fix it. When it came time for the rerelease it likely came up again and the… Read more »
Jim Sterling
Guest

You are correct. In retrospect, it was wrong to pin it on QA. I’ve amended the review to reflect that.

mada77
Guest
mada77

Thanks and I just wanted to add that I think it’s awesome that you take the time to read through all the comments and consider what everyone here has to say

Justin Graham
Guest
Justin Graham

A coworker got fed up with Fallout 4 when she realized a bug that had previously been in Skyrim and fixed in a patch reemerged in Fallout 4. Bethesda doesn’t have a good track record at all in terms of maintaining their core Elder Scrolls/Fallout engine and I imagine it must frustrate QA to no end having to deal with the developers on these games.

I really wish Bethesda would just buckle down and spend time debugging a lot of the recurrent issues that the engine suffers from.

mada77
Guest
mada77
Reoccurring bugs are very frustrating from a QA perspective mostly because they are the least likely ones to get fixed. The rationale being that if they could ship the game with that bug present in a previous iteration of a title they can ship another with it so fixing those becomes a low priority. Unless it is something very game breaking or something that could cause them to fail certification (the testing console manufacturers do before allowing a game to be sold on their machine. I get why Bethesda has so much trouble with bugs. It has a lot to… Read more »
Justin Graham
Guest
Justin Graham

I work in QA and I’m quite familiar with technical debt. A lot of smaller issues can get pushed from one release to the next, but there comes a point where problems still need to be addressed. Otherwise you’re just going to give yourself massive headaches down the road.

Bethesda’s problem is that they apparently have no interest in tackling that debt. It seems the only reason that they’d tackle fixing any of their old code is if it directly impedes something desired for their current project.

mada77
Guest
mada77

Im in QA as well so my apologies for talking down a bit. Some companies are more proactive in tackling their debt than others definitely. From what Ive seen though the bigger the game the less likely lingering issues get resolved.

kevattack
Guest
kevattack

Am I the only person who just doesn’t give a fuck about mods? Like, I get the appeal, technical improvements and general fun weirdness, but I just feel like even the most basic mods actively compromise the integrity of the intended experience the devs created. I would just rather play the game the developer made, warts and all, with atmosphere and intent intact

Anton
Guest
Anton
Hate to break it to you, but the games that ship are very rarely the games that devs intend them to be. If you watch any (honest) dev diary/postmortem, they all say “well, we had all of these cool features we wanted to have in game, but we had to cut them due to time/money constraints”. Similarly, games are often constrained graphically because they have to run on the weakest system available. Not that I have anything against playing vanilla versions, it’s just that I don’t see a “original intent” as a valid argument given how much these things are… Read more »
kevattack
Guest
kevattack
You make a fair point, but I don’t agree. To expand a bit more on my original point, to me, the finished product of popular art is a combination of the original intent and the constraints it was made under, which is a unique phenomenon that cannot be replicated. If you remove constraints, you get disasters like George Lucas’s attempts to “improve” star wars. So I’d revise my original point to not say “intent,” but rather “result.” This original result means something to me, as it stands, which is why I never feel like compromising that experience (even if it… Read more »
Anton
Guest
Anton

That’s fair.

CaitSeith
Guest
CaitSeith

I want to mention a point of view of mine: as popular art, most games aren’t finished products. I don’t mean it by them being glitchy or incomplete. I mean that traditionally the game experience isn’t complete without the player taking the controls and playing the game.

A movie can play without someone watching. A song can be performed without anyone listening. But most games can’t reproduce their content without anyone playing.

I consider games as art are more a collaborative effort between developers and players (and some of the best games I have played embrace that). But that’s just my opinion.

kevattack
Guest
kevattack

That’s a really interesting viewpoint, and something I hadn’t really considered. Modding games definitely doesn’t have an easy direct parallel in more static mediums, because passive viewers don’t have many opportunities to contribute directly. I still think developers are making an attempt at directing the player’s contribution to the game’s artistic process to get an intended experience, and that’s something mods can disrupt, but you’re definitely right in saying that games have a significantly greater variety of experience and meaning, even just in the original context

CaitSeith
Guest
CaitSeith

I agree. It doesn’t require 50/50 creative input. And first, developers must decide how much freedom and interactivity they plan to give to the player. I consider there is no ideal amount of interactivity to make a good game. It’s their execution what matters.

Jonathan Roth
Guest
Jonathan Roth

There’s a lot of games where I agree with you, and I’m generally pretty light on mods outside Bethesda’s Creation Kit games.

Skyrim and Fallout occupy an interesting space between a contained experience like The Witcher, and a creator-driven sandbox like Second Life and Minecraft. Mods make them a scaling open-world experience, with optional game-play and balance elements which players can add at will.

I would be interested to see if anyone looks at the Skyrim mod community, and creates a sandbox game development system that finds a middle-ground between a story driven world and solid fan-driven content.

kevattack
Guest
kevattack

That’s actually a really interesting idea. I feel like a lot of games fall on the extremes of directed or created by players, without much compelling stuff in the middle

Stormbringer
Guest
Star Wars is a “lightning in a bottle” thing. A lot of art is just crapshoots. It’s much easier to make a mess than to make a timeless artifact. If you mess with something that’s already on the level that it seems like aliens made it happen with mind control technology based on a billion years old blueprint you’re bound to fuck it up… But on the other hand, with digital technology, we can totally open it up, and make something that has no definitive version, if we don’t get stuck in the trap of fetishizing dead things. In that… Read more »
Grim
Guest
Grim

You’re hardly the only one, but if terrible inventory menus are the developer’s intent, they can keep it.

ladyvader
Guest
ladyvader

No, I’m not a modder. Actually, I feel if you need to mod a game to enjoy it, it’s a bad game.

Klasodeth
Guest
Klasodeth

Anton already made a very good point, but I’d like to add that the ability for the player to mod the game to their personal taste has been part of the developer’s intent since Morrowind.

CaitSeith
Guest
CaitSeith

I kinda agree. I use mods in my first run only when they fix unintended game-breaking issues (like in Dark Souls). But after being done the first time with the original “intended experience”, I see nothing wrong with trying something different from the community (same for DLCs)

Cindipool
Guest
Cindipool
I don’t like mods that make major changes to the game. In Skyrim the mods I use are Sky UI (because it really is better than the vanilla), some minor AI fixes, a rebalancing of atronach spells so they’re of similar power to each other, and something to make leveled quest rewards update to match your level as you gain experience – as well as all the unofficial patches to fix the billion bugs. Anything that makes big changes to the game defies my reasons for playing it in the first place. Having said all that, I get why people… Read more »
Skyhook Rider
Guest
Skyhook Rider

Hey Jim did you purposefully choose to play on playstation 4 or did you play on it because it was provided by the publisher?

gasmaskangel
Guest
gasmaskangel

Great! Now that they have this out of the way they can focus on delivering some serious improvements in Elder Scrolls VI! I can’t wait to hear all about in… 2021.

Nemrex
Guest
Nemrex

Some credit to Bethesda, at least they don’t annualize their franchises, unlike Activision or Ubisoft.

gasmaskangel
Guest
gasmaskangel

True enough. I’m still just bitter about being blue balled on Fallout 4 for what felt like decades.

Polishfury5000
Guest
Polishfury5000
I’m in that niche of people who enjoy trophy/achievement hunting in games, and it’s made me one of the few who really enjoy this generations surge of remasters and such. I agree with this review and the score is completely fair for something with a more niche appeal. I feel the same way with this as I did with the BioShock and Uncharted remasters. They’re games that I’ve loved and haven’t played in years. While nothing is stopping me from playing the old versions, I don’t feel like I’m wasting as much of my limited free time replaying the new… Read more »
Tao
Guest
Tao
No external assets on PS4 with a 1GB limit? I mean, the size limit makes sense with the other restriction, but it’s still bullshit. I had a decent enough PC when I last played Skyrim to experience mods properly so I know the fun of mods, though with that PC being long outta action and not having the money to replace it I was kinda looking forward to the PS4 release…But with the restrictions I’ll probably just give it a pass, or at least wait for a cheap pre-owned copy (since I would still like to buy it, it just… Read more »
ichkanns
Guest
ichkanns

At first I thought that the game didn’t look that improved… Then I stepped out of that first cave and got my first view of the world. The improved lighting, improved render distance and increased foliage density and detail became immediately apparent and very impressive. I can criticize the shit out of Skyrim, but I can’t argue with the fact that I keep coming back to it and have a good time every time, even doing the same old thieves guild and dark brotherhood quests.

diamond
Guest
diamond

Never been a fan of Elder Scrolls, but I feel sorry for those who were hoping for an improved game only to run into the same fucking bugs from five years ago.

Wolfie
Guest
Wolfie

It has improved in some, more technical ways, but those are under-the-hood improvements. It does suck that they couldn’t have done some bug fixing though, and that, granted this is something I only heard and don’t know how true it is, that they’re not going to have a Steam Workshop because something something split the mod community.

I don’t know the accuracy of that, but it doesn’t have Steam Workshop yet, that I do know.

CaitSeith
Guest
CaitSeith

But that’s what made Skyrim so special and memorable in the first place. /s

Seriously though, I agree.

Dave Dogge
Guest
Dave Dogge

I think I loaded it up just under two years ago for XBox 360 and it looked so damned dated.

Tommy Tiddler
Guest
Tommy Tiddler

Speaking of old bugs/glitches carrying over, there is a glitch that has been present in the engine since Morrowind that speedrunners exploit.

If you save pressing against a wall, reload and quickly push forward you will walk straight through the wall

Pacino
Guest
Pacino
I think the new update makes more sense on consoles. The PS3 version was a broken piece of garbage so a working version for the PS4 in an attractive offer. But I have this on PC and actually think it looks worse than the original. The volumetric lighting and TSAA make the game look as though it’s being viewed through vaseline smeared glasses. It also hasn’t aged well at all however there’s only so much you can do with a remaster. Credit to Bethesda for at least making it a free upgrade to those who already owned the console, however… Read more »
Anthony Vaughn
Guest
Anthony Vaughn

I looked forward to SSE mainly for the new 64-bit engine. Old Skyrim would become a crashy mesh, trying to install an ENB+high-res texture pack+Static Mesh Improvement Mod+Open Cities Skyrim, unless you installed additional mods that tried to stabilize it (which only ever barely worked for me). On SSE, I have a ReShade preset, NobleSkyrimMod 2k texture pack, SMIM, and Open Cities Skyrim all installed. Game’s looking great and running smooth as silk.

Speederino
Guest
Speederino
I still love this game as much as I did five years ago. But as someone who has modded the PC version to a ridiculous degree, I sadly see no reason to play the free Special Edition I got. It’s honestly a huge downgrade, in this case (which might be the reason they let previous PC buyers get it for free, for all I know). That said, this sounds well worth it for console players just for the mod support alone. And if that Switch version is real, welp, there goes my life. Even if it doesn’t have mod support,… Read more »
Anthony Vaughn
Guest
Anthony Vaughn

Graphical mods are already being ported/made for SSE. NobleSkyrimMod (a 2k texture pack) has an SSE patch, and SMIM has been ported to SSE. Though there’s no SSE version of ENB yet (I read that Boris is working on it), ReShade works fine, and there’s already plenty of custom ReShade presets on Nexus. It’ll take time, but the mods will come, and being 64-bit, SSE will be able to handle mods a lot better than old Skyrim could.

Speederino
Guest
Speederino

True, I can see potential for Special Edition to be the more definitive version down the line, but at right here, right now…eh.

ManuOtaku
Guest
ManuOtaku

And then i took an arrow in…everywhere.

Agreed on the switch version.

Jacob Tjolsen
Guest
Jacob Tjolsen

It’s at least switched to 64-bit, so mods will be able to be much more powerful now.

Tobasco da Gama
Guest

Once SKSE gets ported over and the mods that rely on it work with the new edition, anyway. 🙂

MyBodyIsReady
Guest
MyBodyIsReady

Did you ever get your Boglins back?

Schultz
Guest
Schultz

“I mostly took note of the game running at a consistent 60 frames-per-second on consoles…”
Wait, what? I thought this was 1080/30fps?

Jim Sterling
Guest

I believe you’re correct and that my brain is not working properly. 🙂

ManuOtaku
Guest
ManuOtaku

It happens, if a person confused uncharted collection with uncharted 4, certainly you could confuse framerates. One can have one of those days.

Anton
Guest
Anton

*Insert snarky anti-Sony comment about UC and UC4 being the same game*

Edward Turvey
Guest
Edward Turvey

The console version is 30fps. Also the resolution is dynamic and can (and does) go lower if needed.

Anton
Guest
Anton

*1080/Cinematic*

Fixed that for ya

BAH!
Guest
BAH!

I’m not one to be down on remasters and re-releases. Every generation, there’s people who haven’t played the “classics” from the previous generation, so it’s nice to get stuff like this. But if you’re going to re-release something, you should also fix the broken bits.

But to Bethesda’s credit, at least they payed attention to performance. It’s more than Activision does.

Burn
Guest
Burn

At Least the xbox one mods has that Unofficial Patch since bethesda didnt feel like fixing bugs

Anton
Guest
Anton

I feel like the games that SHOULD be remastered never get it. My personal list consists of MGS1, SSX games, old Burnout games, and Legacy of Kain. And I bet I will never see any of that updated.

Burn
Guest
Burn

Man I enjoyed SSX and Burnout games. So much fun.

BAH!
Guest
BAH!

Right? Though didn’t MGS1 get an update with the super collection exclusively on the PS3? Or was that the GCN version?

At least we got Duck Tales Remastered. That’s really all I need.

Anton
Guest
Anton

MGS1 got a remaster on the Gamecube, based on the MGS2 engine. Unfortunately, they re-did the voices and cinematics, and a charmingly cringy game became offensively cringy.

Even if that version WAS good, Ninty owns the rights and we will never see it on modern hardware.

BAH!
Guest
BAH!

But… it referenced Nintendo exclusives…

ManuOtaku
Guest
ManuOtaku

The first person view was unnecesary, imho. It hurt the game, especially boss fights.

Anton
Guest
Anton

Like I said, MGS2 engine. The first person view came with it and they put no effort into making it more like the first game.

diamond
Guest
diamond

I strongly disagree, I think the remake is a big improvement over the original game.

ManuOtaku
Guest
ManuOtaku

Onimusha, jade empire, KOTOR,etc., are still not being considered for an HD remaster, criminally so.

Anton
Guest
Anton

Holy shit, I forgot Onimusha, aka favorite game of ten-year-old me.

ManuOtaku
Guest
ManuOtaku

Imagine the whole series remastered in HD in one package. It will be…. Amazing!

Noam
Guest
Noam

a Jade Empire HD would be great. Just to see the best NPC ever in HD.

Polishfury5000
Guest
Polishfury5000

Best NPC…are we talking Black Whirlwind or Henpecked Hou? Or the little girl who harbors the demon?Mad Kang? Or….damn….Jade Empire had a ton of sweet NPCs. That series could use some HD love.

Noam
Guest
Noam

I’m talking about the only gentlemen who’s trying to bring civility to those savages, Sir Roderick Ponce Von Fontlebottom the Magnificent Bastard with his sweet lady Mirabelle (Obviously joking there.)

Seriously that gun is freaking amazing.

Henpecked Hou is pretty awesome too though, Drunk Stance is such a blast.

Polishfury5000
Guest
Polishfury5000

Great call, I forgot about that quest, but it was one of the best quests in the game. The civil debate before hand, wooing the judges to your side, and finally that fight against that marvellously over powered blunderbuss. So much fun.

Noam
Guest
Noam

He’s also voiced by John Cleese. How can you not love the man.

Justin Graham
Guest
Justin Graham

MGS1 technically sort of got one in the Twin Snakes remake.

galactix100
Guest
galactix100

I’ve never understood why people but HD remakes when you already own the fucker.

Burn
Guest
Burn

I believe just for those visual upgrades.

Anton
Guest
Anton

When you only play on console but still want all the shiny graphics.

galactix100
Guest
galactix100

If people genuinely do that they shouldn’t be allowed money.

Anton
Guest
Anton

Ehh, gaming is an inherently wasteful hobby. I won’t begrudge people for being slightly more wasteful.

Morgoth
Guest
Morgoth

Haha, nice high horse you got there, buddy.

galactix100
Guest
galactix100

I’ll readily admit that I’m not very funny but I’d have thought that the post was hyperbolic enough to be obvious bollocks

Anton
Guest
Anton

Sarcasm is impossible to communicate in a world where plenty of people earnestly think what you thought was too stupid to believe.

galactix100
Guest
galactix100

Yeah. It’s my fault for trying really.

Anton
Guest
Anton

Well, you’ve learned a valuable lesson: never try

galactix100
Guest
galactix100

I’ll try not to.

Jim Sterling
Guest

People should be able to buy whatever gives them pleasure if they’re not hurting noone.

I spend a good deal of money on toys and statues. Many would call that wasteful, but they make me happy, so fuck ’em.

Morgoth
Guest
Morgoth

As a fellow collector, hat tip to you, Mr. Sterling.

galactix100
Guest
galactix100

I should say I waste plenty of money of tat as well but it’s stuff I like so it’s OK and not at all hypocritical.

Anton
Guest
Anton

I’ll one up you and admit that I own several hundred dollars’ worth of Halo Mega Bloks. I’m not proud, but I fucking love those things.

galactix100
Guest
galactix100

I have Mass Effect 2 playing cards. I’m a perfect example of why some people shouldn’t be allowed money.

Anton
Guest
Anton

Is…. is Joker the Joker?

galactix100
Guest
galactix100

Yup.

Anton
Guest
Anton

All is right with the universe then.

zarathustra2k1
Guest
zarathustra2k1

“not hurting noone”
Lovely double-negative-with-missing-hyphen there, Sterlingson.
8/10

Jim Sterling
Guest

There are a number of reasons – sometimes the visual upgrades are important to people, or they didn’t get the DLC when it was first out, so the DLC + upgrade is a good deal. Others will just pay for the convenience of having a favorite game on their newer, installed machine.

Convenience is king.

galactix100
Guest
galactix100
So I had a look. On Steam the DLC totals at around £30 which is what the special edition costs. However, on consoles it’s nearer £40 on amazon and MS are wanting £50 for the digital version so it seems that cost effectiveness only seems to apply to the PC players (don’t they get a free upgrade if they already owned the game?) On a side note have you ever considered a Jimquisition on digital game prices? I’m not sure about other platforms but pretty much every major release is more expensive on the xbox store when I thought the… Read more »
BAH!
Guest
BAH!
It’s funny, because Ben Kuchera thought the exact same thing when it was rumored the Xbone would be digital only. As usual, he was very excited at the prospect; and insisted such a move would lead to lower prices for games because of perfectly reasonable reasons and one very naive expectation. He quickly got a very large serving of reality in the comments. But it’s very strange that Xbone digital titles are more expensive, and I’ve seen others comment on it, as well. Unless you mean that prices don’t drop nearly as quickly as they do on Steam and other… Read more »
galactix100
Guest
galactix100

I’m talking about digital prices being higher than physical. That said I don’t get why prices don’t fall sooner. They still want £54 for CoD Ghosts and Black Ops 3, they want £40 for FIFA 16. All these games have newer iterations available or imminent yet they want full price or higher for them.

BAH!
Guest
BAH!

Keep in mind that retailers are the middle men, and have limited space to store any backstock. So one reason a physical copy might drop in price sooner is simply because the store needs to get rid of it, whereas a digital copy takes up no “room” to speak of, and is therefore immune to that particular influence. Also, digital copies often carry a higher profit margin, so you can bet your ass they’re going to stay as high as possible for as long as possible.

TURBOLATOR
Guest
TURBOLATOR
Digital prices are high because publishers don’t want to undercut retailers (their primary source of income) and in turn get worse conditions there. If retailers saw that publishers were competing with them with digital sales, they might put those publishers’ games in a worse spot from a sales perspective (physically moving copies or ads behind “nicer” publishers’ games, and treat them similarly on webshops) in order to promote games they *dont* have as much competition with, to sell more games overall. Retailers don’t care which games they sell, as long as they sell a lot of games. If digital copies… Read more »
galactix100
Guest
galactix100

Interesting. Makes sense. Thanks for the explanation.

Edward Gemmer
Guest
Edward Gemmer

That was my reason. I loved the game but my 360 is in the grimy hands of my oldest daughter and I can’t both be a self respecting man and sit in a ten year girl’s room playing Skyrim while she gives me the side eye.

I hadn’t thought a lot about the mods, but am finding them fun as well, mostly because you can get rid of the annoyances in the game like encumbrance and shopkeepers with 30 gold pieces.

Burn
Guest
Burn

Well luckily on the Xbox One u can download that Unofficial Patch.

goodbyejojo
Guest
goodbyejojo

i dunno man, after playing the souls series, skyrim’s combat is a joke

Varga Ádám
Guest
Varga Ádám

It’s barely more than click towards enemy, no matter what you compare to : High enemy hp + simple combat system = lot of unrewarding combat

Extradaemon
Guest
Extradaemon

ESO is the only Scrolls game with actual deep combat.

galactix100
Guest
galactix100

It’s always been shite.

Anton
Guest
Anton

To be fair, combat in RPGs has rarely been rewarding from a visceral feedback sense, especially in older titles. And while Skyrim isn’t technically old, it’s built on some pretty old bones.

Gurphardt
Guest

Seriously. Skyrim’s combat may be basic AF but when the baseline for most RPGs for years and years has been press button, wait for action to queue, hope it hits I’ll take something with a little more feedback.

Jim Sterling
Guest

If Skyrim were purely a combat-centered game, this comparison would be more relevant. As it stands, we’re talking about two very different games.

This is not to say Elder Scrolls’ combat couldn’t use improvements, but to go straight to Dark Souls from Skyrim and focus solely on the thing Dark Souls does *incredibly* well isn’t entirely fair.

ManuOtaku
Guest
ManuOtaku

Also that a third person view style of combat might not bode well with a first person view game.

GoingPostal13
Guest
GoingPostal13

You can play Skyrim in first or third person.

Anton
Guest
Anton

Third person in any Bethesda game looks jank as fuck.

ManuOtaku
Guest
ManuOtaku

Playing skyrim in third person view, is a Big NO in my book. oh, the horrors.

GoingPostal13
Guest
GoingPostal13

But how else can you get to see your lovingly crafted Dragonscale armour? 🙂

ManuOtaku
Guest
ManuOtaku

Only for that…i give you that 🙂

Anton
Guest
Anton

Slowmo kill animation?

GoingPostal13
Guest
GoingPostal13

Actually, I’m thinking of starting this from scratch again so I can do the whole Assassin’s Guild quest line with plenty of slow mo kills.

MermaidShadow
Guest
MermaidShadow

Oddly, I’m the opposite. I use first-person in Skyrim exclusively for archery – if the game zooms into first-person in any other circumstance, THAT’S horror. Incredibly disorienting, and the faces of those NPCs…*shudder*

Morgoth
Guest
Morgoth

Are the bugs in HD?

Anton
Guest
Anton

You can really see the detail on the questgiver NPC clipping through the ceiling.

ManuOtaku
Guest
ManuOtaku

Probably not, the game is in HD because it is a tiny content compare with the Bugs content, it would be a gargantuan task. 😛

ManuOtaku
Guest
ManuOtaku

I will get this just for the DLC that i did miss for my lack of internet. Graphic improvements are a minor bonus for me.

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