The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild Review – Broken Sword

A little bit Tri-forced.

Developer: Nintendo
Publisher: Nintendo
Format: Nintendo Switch
Released: March 3, 2017
Copy purchased

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is a beautiful game with a richly detailed world. It’s packed with things to do and places to explore, doing an incredible job of turning Hyrule into a vast expanse of possibility as opposed to a sparse field with gameplay sprouting off it like spokes on a wheel.

At its absolute best, Breath of the Wild offers some of the most absorbing experiences a Zelda game ever has.

Unfortunately, it makes you work harder for it than you should, buried as it is under a pile of small but constant irritations that collaborate to form a thick crust of frustration around a delectable center. Breath of the Wild is a delightful adventure, one that tries its utmost to be as big a pain in the arse as possible.

Ganon is back, and this time he’s dispensed with the mystery. No longer working in the shadows before his ultimate obligatory reveal, he appears from the start as Calamity Ganon, an apocalyptic version of his porcine form swirling around a devastated Hyrule Castle

Link awakens after a failed battle against Ganon’s forces 100 years ago, having lost his memory, his strength, and his legendary sword. Zelda’s spent the past century trying to keep Ganon restricted to the castle, and now it’s up to Link to do the thing he does best and come to her aid.

After a brief introductory phase in which Link solves some puzzles, acquires a full suite of magical runes to help him get around the world, and learns the typically rudimentary plot, Hyrule opens itself up like a Smart Home in the wrong hands and from there players are able to go and do as they wish.

Theoretically, it’s possible to march from the starting area to the castle and fight Calamity Ganon there and then. Of course, the chances of actually surviving more than a second or two are incredibly slim, and that’s even if you can get through the nigh-impervious mechanical Guardians that patrol Hyrule Field and are merrily capable of one-shotting even more prepared adventurers.

To stand a believable chance against Nintendo’s favorite canned evil, Link must travel to the familiar homes of the Zora, Rito, Gorons and Gerudo, solving their problems and subduing the Divine Beasts – gigantic, animalistic constructs once piloted by legendary champions and now corrupted by a naughty magic pig.

These beasts each have their own detailed quest lines in which Link must travel to and then align with the disparate peoples of Hyrule. They also serve as the closest thing to traditional dungeons in the game, though they’re more akin to four gigantic puzzle rooms with concluding boss fights than the intricate, deadly sprawls offered in past games.

Puzzles are the central component to the unbelievable amount of Shrines littering the world. These mysterious places activated once Link got his Sheikah Slate, an almost cringeworthy in-universe Nintendo Switch that Link uses as a map, telescope, and fantasy multipass, and they are the key to improving his health and stamina.

Some are found in plain sight, while others need coaxing out of the ground or can be found at the end of side quests. Once activated, they become a handy fast travel point and offer a unique puzzle or (rarely) combat challenge, usually short but often just tricky enough to stimulate the brain.

The majority of these puzzles make use of Link’s runes – including bombs, ice blocks summoned from water, a stasis effect, and a magnet that can place metal objects anywhere in range. Motion controls are obviously employed for several of them because this is a Nintendo game, but they’re mostly cleverly designed and the rewards are crucial to both survival and long-term enjoyment of the game.

Nevertheless, it’s an odd decision to constantly break immersion and flow by halting the player and giving them yet another weird little puzzle bunker that seems like it doesn’t quite belong in this world and reeks of a game that knew it needed traditional Zelda dungeons but didn’t know quite where to shove them.

Yes, every shrine is technically optional in the same way not rocking up to Ganon’s front door and assaulting his forces with a tree branch is – you can do whatever you like, but if you want to have a solid chance of actually succeeding, there is a proper, preconstructed way of doing things, and the proper way of handling shrines is to complete them on sight lest lose track of them – finish as many of them as possible, as close to all 120 of the bloody things as you can.

Given the additional “difficulty” of Breath of the Wild, it’s more crucial than ever to have a solid health supply, and I’ve put “difficulty” in quotes because the main way in which this game tries to be tough is to make most enemies highly absorbent and more than capable of dropping Link in one or two hits.

Rather than fully mimic the Dark Souls combat it half-heartedly aims for, Breath simply pumps up the monsters’ ability to do damage, resulting in a lot of one-hit kills even once Link finds and upgrades some decent armor or puts a lot of shrinework into gaining heart containers. It’s a cheap and dirty way of making any game more “challenging” and I can’t say I find it particularly edifying.

The other major point of contention holding back combat is – and you know I have to say it – weapon durability.

It’s hardly surprising the people of Hyrule can’t definitively put Ganon away since we’ve now learned their swords are made out of glass and wishes. Weapons break in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. They break a LOT, to the point where it starts looking absolutely pathetic, to the point where you wonder why every blacksmith in the world hasn’t been fired or thrown in jail for gross incompetence.

Weapon durability systems are never fun, and Zelda goes out of its way to make it as excruciating as it possibly can. While others have claimed that late game weapons are durable enough for it to not be a problem, I maintain that some of the more powerful weapons in the game are still miserably brittle, able to withstand maybe a handful of enemies before players get a nagging pop-up notifying them their fun with the weapon they might have been loving is about to conclude.

Once the weapon embarrassingly shatters, players will need to pause their combat – which is always something you want players to do as a designer – and select a new weapon to irreparably damage. Either that, or scrabble for something on the ground, even if it’s one of the hundreds of crap clubs that will be thrust upon Link right up until the end of the game.

Also, don’t get too excited when you find the handful of weapons that can be “repaired.” They can’t be. They break like everything else, and will need exorbitant resources spent with specific NPCs to reforge – exorbitant to the point of literally not being worth it. The only truly lasting weapon is the Master Sword, which itself comes with caveats.

Weapon durability has become a controversial talking point for this game. Some have defended it, claiming it’s not a big problem and that it “encourages variety.” I’m firmly among those who believe that it doesn’t encourage variety so much as it discourages using most of the cool weapons you find for fear of losing them, and turns their acquisition into something unexciting, almost disappointing.

Opening a chest to find another disposable weapon that I can’t get attached to is a letdown, not a reward. Never have I been so happy to just find 100 rupees at the end of a trial. At least I can invest those in something I might get to keep and enjoy, like a fancy tiara or a house.

When actually smacking enemies around, the game is quite satisfying. The monsters themselves are a big part of why, expressive and vivid as they are. During combat, they’ll scramble for their weapons, taunt Link, and excitedly jump around. If you disarm and steal their weaponry, they’ll react with horror or outrage.

Even when not fighting, they’re up to all sorts of chicanery – you’ll find Bokoblins hunting wild animals on horseback, or a bunch of Lizalfos huddled together chattering. I once found a couple of enemies making fun of some sheep. Why not, eh?

The way they move, sound, and behave is fantastic, and they react hilariously when slapped about the place.

While not a survival game by any means, Breath of the Wild does take some elements from the emergent genre, such as hunting and cooking. Hyrule is filled with animals to slay, fruit to pick, and bugs to catch, all of which can be turned into various meals and elixirs that not only heal Link but grant temporary buffs such as increased attack or defense, higher speed, health boosts, and stamina recovery.

Despite the awkward way in which food is cooked – you have to find a pot on a fire, then fiddle about in the menu to hold individual bits of food before manually tossing them in – it’s surprisingly fun to combine various foods and see what you get. Certain combinations can create intricate dishes with exceptional benefits, though throwing five Ironshrooms into the pot will definitely do the trick if you want a strong-as-heck defense bump.

Incidentally, I cannot recommend enough finding as many “hearty” foods as you can. Food with this property will create those temporary additional hearts, and you’ll be able to make dishes that grant up to twenty of the things at once rather easily. Hearty meals have saved my life on more than one occasion, and given that you need to beat four shrines for a single heart container, they’re the best way to keep you hardy enough to survive at least a couple of hits against most opponents.

Horses are found in the wilds and can be snuck up on and mounted for a cheeky ride. Any captured horse can be taken to a stable and kept for future use. You’ll be able to equip them with gear, though the finding and even use of this gear is obtuse and poorly explained, and rename them in ways that make the stable keeper’s dialog extra fun.

Now let’s talk about stamina.

If you’ve ever wanted to spend hours watching a little green circle get progressively less green, this is the game for you! A garish stamina wheel appears whenever Link runs, climbs, swims, or uses his paraglider, and not only is it ugly, it’s woefully inefficient to the point where even my fat ass could outrun this easily winded little sack of nothing.

It took four stamina upgrades – and remember these come at the cost of new heart containers – to get the stamina wheel to a point I’d find acceptable as the starting amount. By basically upgrading enough to have two stamina wheels, Link was able to sprint just long enough to not be ludicrous, and I had to solve sixteen shrines to get it that way.

Climbing and swimming, both potentially lethal activities if Link runs out of energy halfway into the endeavor, will eat up stamina fast and you’ll be wanting elixirs on hand if you plan any major vertical traversal. Link is apparently Spider-man now, able to scale even flat walls, but it takes a lot out of him and an excessive amount of time can be spent slowly plodding up mountains, watching that ugly green circle tick itself down.

Mountains and other high places become even more annoying when it starts to rain. It rains a lot in this game, and when it rains, you can’t climb. You can try, but Link slips so many times you’ll almost inevitably run out of stamina before you find a stable ledge to stand on. It’s one of those Nintendo things, where a silly little detail was implemented simply to have more silly little details regardless of how it actually affected gameplay.

If you were already halfway up a mountain before it started raining, you’re buggered. You’ll either need to hope you landed somewhere sheltered so you can start a fire (in another awkward bit of menu management and item holding), or abandon all your progress and paraglide to an inn or somewhere else that passes the time.

If none of those options seem viable, you can always wait. Just wait, wait, wait until the game decides you can play it again.

These are the sorts of annoyances Breath of the Wild is full of. Minor inconveniences and shows of disrespect toward the player’s time.

Enemy encounters that suck up your resources, cluttered menus that are a hassle to get through, the same old fucking cutscenes every time you open, enter, and complete shrines. Frequent interruptions when monsters respawn during a “blood moon” – the modern equivalent of Castlevania II‘s notorious “curse” text box.

Added to the weapon breakages and pitiful stamina meter, these otherwise inconsequential grievances amount to one huge collaborative wall between me and my enjoyment of the game.

I hate that this fresh Zelda is so committed to tripping its audience up and forcing frequent detours and stoppages rather than encouraging the variety others so adamantly laud. Yes, Breath of the Wild is packed with variety, boasts tons of content, and features some absolutely breathtaking moments – but when I reflect upon the overall game, the most memorable portions were notifications about how fragile my swords were and bright green wheels, because these “features” were inextricable built into almost all of it.

All that said, this is a good game, one you have to fight a lot. Simply exploring the world, climbing trees, hunting boars, all of this is terrific stuff. It’s amazing to finally roam a Hyrule that feels alive and lived in, more than just a hub or set dressing. I particularly love how NPCs can be found throughout the world, traveling to sell wares or fighting random monsters in the woods.

Varied environments, from deep forests to large deserts to the ever-present Death Mountain offer not just visual diversity but unique climate hazards. Link will need to eat meals with elemental resistances or otherwise find and wear special armor to withstand harsh areas, with particularly cold and hot places capable of harming him.

I fought my way to the Goron village without flame resistance gear, hurriedly running from hot spring to hot sprint in order to stop being on fire, and as tough as it was, it was an enjoyable kind of tough. I could have obtained some elixirs and done it more safely, but it was genuinely thrilling to survive the harshest climate possible and finally make my way to the expected flameproof armor sold in town.

A personal anecdote like that is part of what makes Breath of the Wild an accomplished production. There are so many little touches, so many optional paths, that players inevitably wind up with experiences unique to themselves. Whether you’re using magnesis to drop metal blocks on enemy heads or finding some unique solution to a puzzle that was unintended but works just as well with the runes you have, Zelda packs in a lot of special moments.

Try and get a Moblin to hit a Cucco. You’ve maybe seen the video already.

There’s so much to love it’s hard to list all the pleasing revelations. Of course you can drop a bit of raw meat in front of a dog and watch it happily eat up. Of course you can hit a barrel with stasis, hit it several times, and watch it fly into an enemy camp once stasis breaks and momentum flings it away. If you can imagine doing it, there’s at least half a chance Breath of the Wild anticipated your imagination and offered a reaction to your action.

Presentation is, unsurprisingly, as high as it possibly can be. Despite the Switch’s inferior resolution and graphical power, Breath of the Wild proves art direction beats horsepower by remaining gorgeous throughout, while the soundtrack is arresting as ever, employing familiar Zelda tunes only sparingly while offering some lovely original music.

Framerate chug lets the side down, especially in areas with a lot of tall grass and a number of encounters in or around Hyrule Castle. In one particular fight, the framerate struggled so much I was getting full-on freezes, while the starting area paints a terrible first impression of both the game and the Switch as a system. Much of the game avoids this issue, but certain places are just lousy, though it’s worth noting the game does perform markedly better when the Switch isn’t running picture to a television.

Draw distance is a problem too. You’re encouraged to use your Sheikah-Not-A-Switch as a telescope and scout out areas, but it’s hard to surveil an enemy base when you’re too far away for the enemies to appear in it. Sometimes I found myself not knowing whether or not a place was dangerous until I was close enough to be spotted by the danger, because it hadn’t been rendered yet. Other times I’d watch monsters blink in and out of existence, which doesn’t make for believable worldbuilding outside of a Wizrobe battle.

Oh, and the voice acting? Those performers using American accents are all pretty good, while the English accented ones are frigging shameful. Zelda especially sounds like such a wet blanket it’s almost depressing. It’s a shame they couldn’t find a better cast for what should have been an enthralling new move for the series.

One should be warned also that Breath of the Wild officially turns amiibo into the overly expensive DLC they were always criticized for being. A number of exclusive armor sets and weapons – as well as a full-fledged NPC ally – can only be acquired by scanning Nintendo’s toys, though interestingly the Breath of the Wild specific amiibo offer the least interesting rewards. If you want good costumes or special armaments, expect to buy a lot of plastic.

There is a laundry list of smaller complaints and points of praise that I could just trot out, but such comprehensive detail isn’t particularly necessary at this stage. It should be quite clear by now that this is a game I truly enjoyed and wanted to love far more than I did, held back considerably by frequent tests of patience that I more often than not failed.

Too many times does Breath of the Wild paint its players into corners rather than encourage “varied” playstyles. Too many times does Breath of the Wild force its players into performing mundane tasks or sidetrack their way out of the experience. Too few bosses are anything approaching memorable or exciting, while we’re at it.

Yet it’s an adorable game, a frequently exciting game, one with lots of cool armor pieces to wear and little secrets to uncover. Its menagerie of monsters is incredible and its massive, complex map is inspiring.

Truly, I wish I could say I understood what all the critics were raving about in their onslaught of 10/10 reviews, but I don’t. I see too many things getting in the way of the brilliance, too much repetitive busywork and full-on dick moves for me to say this is even close to my favorite Zelda game, much less in the top five.

Close, but no Triforce.

Also, it has Ubisoft-style radio towers in it. Really dreary, long, climby ones. Go figure.

7/10
Good

Tommy Laukkanen
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Tommy Laukkanen

Sounds a lot like my experience

cowboyjimmy
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cowboyjimmy

i wonder if somebody will say something like, “ah, its Jim being Jim again, going against the grain as usual, AC2, MW2, MK7, ETC

Theclaw Yaww
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Theclaw Yaww

Great review I wondered if I was gonna buy cause it got only 10s and people saying “one of the best game of all time” but when I saw gameplay it didnt looked that good. You brought up things I havent seen any other reviewer do.

P.S. Twilight Princess IS the best Zelda

Powermad80
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Powermad80

Twilight Princess has by far and away the best dungeons in zelda and I love it immensely but even I can’t put it above BotW.

Andy24
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Andy24

I’m not a huge fan of TP dungeons, they’re so lame puzzle-design wise. They nailed atmosphere, but they rely on the classic Zelda puzzle that makes you feel smart. Alas, they aren’t actually clever and they’re very self-contained. Mark Brown from Gamemaker Toolkit elaborated on this quite wonderfully.

Theclaw Yaww
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Theclaw Yaww

Thats cool I just love TP the dungeons as you said are probably the best, I love that it has an actual cool story and cinematic feel to it and the combat and Items are great. The biggest flaws is that the wolf mechanic could have been utilized better and the soundtrack is repetetive and isnt orchestral

Trafalgar
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Trafalgar

“Truly, I wish I could say I understood what all the critics were raving about in their onslaught of 10/10 reviews, but I don’t.”

Aw, comon jim that ones easy: Diffrent people like diffrent things 😉

Fallen Prime
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Fallen Prime

True. Some people like the taste of Hylian cum.

[/s]

Kitnighty
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Kitnighty

woah dude

Ken Kimmell
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Ken Kimmell

I think Jim’s pissy-ness at Nintendo is highly effecting his review of this. This is easily the best 3D Zelda game by far. 7/10 is way to harsh. Jim has been outspoken about his hate for Nintendo for a long long time and now it’s getting to him. 9/10 is the lowest score out of hundreds of reviews. A 7/10 is just attention whoring and trying to get back at Nintendo. Shame on you, Jim.

darksteel6
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darksteel6

no it ain’t.

Ken Kimmell
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Ken Kimmell

Yeah it really is. 9/10 is the lowest score out of hundreds of reviews. Jim is doing this purely for attention and his hatred of Nintendo.

theeheadache
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theeheadache

right..

darksteel6
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darksteel6

considering Jim gets no ad revenue from people visiting his site, you are completely and totally off-base there.

Carter
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Carter

attention = money or?

darksteel6
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darksteel6

moron

Carter
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Carter

I disagree, but I also agree at the same time. I’m conflicted.

Geebun
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Geebun

You know there’s this thing called having an opinion right? To me Skyward Sword is easily the best zelda game since the SNES and I have no interest in this game as it seems to take way too much from Minecraft and Skyrim for my likings but I’m not going to say people are wrong when they say this is their favorite Zelda games.

Carter
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Carter

I don’t think he’s saying that Jim isn’t allowed to have an opinion, only that he personally (opinion) thinks that Jim’s opinion might be skewed. Might be.

Geebun
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Geebun

Claiming 7/10 is way too harsh is pretty close to “Your opinion is wrong.” 😛

Carter
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Carter

But do we really need to explain that what we’re typing is our opinion though, without other people attacking us as if we’re taking someone else’s opinion away?

Jim said his thing, now Ken is saying his.

Neither of them should be obliged to say ‘THIS IS MY OPINION BY THE WAY GUYS.’

Don’t you think?

Okay maybe I’m wrong in this case, this guy does seem to be commenting as if he’s stating facts. MB.

Geebun
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Geebun

I never said they had to say it was their opinion…but claiming Jim didn’t like the game because it’s Nintendo just seems kind of silly, maybe he just didn’t like the game because of the multiple reasons he pointed out in his review.

Fallen Prime
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Fallen Prime

I think you’re flaming for attention.

Viking Mana
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Viking Mana

Oh, right, you’ve proven a former point of mine by immediate reverting to the “Jim is just doing this for attention!”-tactic when he has nothing positive to gain from said attention.

If you really think his score is too harsh, and based entirely on his distaste for Nintendo, then why don’t you explain what arguments he’s made in his review that you think are false, instead of just proclaiming that this game is a 9/10 by default, and that no other opinion is possible?

Fallen Prime
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Fallen Prime

Buddy.

Your roll.

Maybe slow it.

Viking Mana
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Viking Mana

Dear Ken Kimmell.

Do you understand the concept of subjective opinions, and how some people might have different opinions, and how something you may have enjoyed might not be enjoyed by others?

I assume not, given that you’ve already said that a 7/10 is “Way too harsh”, as though it was a 3/10.

Nathan Aldana
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Nathan Aldana

I mean. the only zelda game I ever completed was the one with the wind fish. So I guess to me that makes it the best one.

Powermad80
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Powermad80

Link’s Awakening, and that’s a damn good one.

Mister Lamp
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Mister Lamp

Iunno, it seems fair. I’d personally have given it like a 3/10 based on just the fact that it has a weapon durability system, which has never been fun in the history of video games.

Nygile Oliver
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Nygile Oliver

It’s not attention whoring at all, he wrote an ENTIRE review explaining his points and they are all equally valid, even if you disagree with them. We can all have different views, that’s the beauty of something like video games. Even if you disagree with him, what are you gonna do? Break your weapons on him? :^)

stryker1121
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stryker1121

Wow you cracked that code, Ken.

galactix100
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galactix100

Complaining about a review score is just attention whoring and trying to get back at Jim. Shame on you, Ken Kimmell.

Jinx 01
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Jinx 01

A 7 isn’t bad, it literally says “GOOD” right below the score. Get over it.

Muddy Scarecrow
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Muddy Scarecrow

You didn’t actually read the review did you? Since all you’re talking about is the score I’m going to assume you didn’t actually read the review. And who the fuck cares if 9/10 is the lowest score it’s gotten? It’s just as easy to assume that those people are lying about their scores because they’re pledging allegiance to Nintendo or just don’t wanna upset the fans. Not saying that’s true. Just saying that going by your logic it’s just as likely.

Wolfie
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Wolfie

You know what’s also attention whoring? Blaming critics for bullshit cause you got your nipples in a twist cause they didn’t totally fellatio a game you love, and using “BUT EVERYONE ELSE” as an excuse.

Jake
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Jake

At the height of Jim’s “fuck Konami” phase, he gave Phantom Pain a 9/10. Your logic doesn’t check out.

CaitSeith
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CaitSeith

I disagree. Jim is very adverse towards microtransactions too, and they don’t affect the game scores for those games that have them.

AlexAndThunder
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AlexAndThunder
I’m actually surprised you’re not more infuriated at the motion control puzzles? I just did the one with three balls/switches (same shrine starts off with motion control spike puzzles) and dear god was it beyond infuriating. It makes the same mistake the 2D Platforming did in Secret endgame Pitioss Dungeon in FFXV where they force a 3D Area into a Psuedo-2D area. I had a tough time doing it on TV because I couldn’t understand which way the motion control was moving and when I did it on the Switch, the puzzle was basically obscured from my vision one way… Read more »
Sam
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Sam

I haven’t bought the game yet but was very excited to try it, and I found your review very helpful and informative, now that I know about some of its flaws I can be prepared for them and not be hammered by disappointment when I pick it up and get tired on a mountain the first time. Good review!

David Ruckman
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David Ruckman

While I disagree on some points, this is probably my new favorite Zelda, I’m really glad you decided not to follow the hype train. Reviews Skyward Sword’s were bias enough, and this game took it to the next level.

But 7/10 is still a good score. People who get made at that score are just salty fanboys.

TetraSky
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TetraSky

Good review. For those who actually read the entire thing and didn’t just look at the final score only to hate on Jim because he didn’t give it 10/10.

Jonathan Phillips
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Jonathan Phillips

Not sure if this is intended, but the Sheikah Stone and Blood Moon links both show the same picture. It makes a bunch more sense on the Blood Moon, so I imagine it’s not intended. Just a heads up there.

Niels Peter Sjørslev
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Niels Peter Sjørslev

I imagine that this score ain’t gonna be popular

aleotothepast
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aleotothepast

See, I disagree. However, I’m not going to be a [♪SKELETON WARRIORS♫] about it. That’s the difference between having a differing opinion and being an arsehole, and it’s surprisingly easy to grasp. So why can’t some people?

Andy24
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Andy24
I think we all agree, it is a good game. Different strokes for different folks, I disagree with a lot of Jim’s points; I have my arguments to do so. But I think it boils down to whether a certain mechanic truly bothers me. For instance, rain never bugged me as much as there’s always another way to get to an area. A lot of the amazing things the game does are enough for me to outweigh the negatives such as the execution of weapon durability, which I do think needed to be in the game. Problem is execution not… Read more »
Jamesworkshop
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Jamesworkshop

For a game series with a near constant level of artistic brilliance, the stamina meter seem so bizarrely out-of-place, that it feels like something that was added in by some outsourced developer.

Andy24
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Andy24

it’s there to balance the game out, otherwise you could climb any surface and it would break the combat system in place as well. To me, it’s only annoying on the plateau, since you can use the paraglider to drop off areas afterwards, it never got on my nerves.

Jamesworkshop
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Jamesworkshop

I meant as a visual element, and not a game play one.

I haven’t gotten to play it myself, I’m hoping that the switch will drop the 2nd hand market price for the Wii U, and I can pick one up on the cheap.

Andy24
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Andy24

That’s true, the pro HUD mode addresses a lot of the visual clutter such as the temperature gauge. I’m not bothered by it, though.

buzzardslicer
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buzzardslicer

The free climbing wouldn’t work without it. It makes traversing the land more interesting when Link can’t just climb infinitely. It makes you have to consider your path like an actual explorer. From what I’ve found you can climb every single mountain with beginning level stamina from multiple angles if you go about it right

darksteel6
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darksteel6

The Tomb Raider games didn’t do any of that Stamina bullshit and they were no less interesting to explore.

Carter
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Carter

you missed the /s

Andy24
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Andy24

The system in the Raider games was there to reach set areas by the designer. You can’t reach every area in Tomb Raider, if you take out the stamina in Zelda, you jeopardize the cooking system, the combat and movement itself. I never had a problem with it, because through cooking as well as upgrades you can deal with said shortcoming.

buzzardslicer
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buzzardslicer

I’d argue that Tomb Raider was a much, MUCH less interesting game to explore than BOTW. It’s not even an open world game. You might as well compare it to uncharted which is also a linear game with infinite climbing for it’s high octane set pieces

darksteel6
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darksteel6

It’s very different from Uncharted and it is an open-world game, just not the same type of open world game.

buzzardslicer
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buzzardslicer

It’s not an open world game. It’s linear game with some decently sized hub areas, If it is open world it is the absolute barest minimum for what qualifies as one

darksteel6
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darksteel6

Tomb Raiders tombs were way fucking better

buzzardslicer
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buzzardslicer

If we’re comparing contained puzzle rooms then BOTW handily blows TR ’13 out of the water. The “tombs” were very rare to find and their puzzles were ridiculously easy

darksteel6
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darksteel6

I was more referring to Rise of the Tomb Raider, those rooms were awesome.

Scott Neil
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Scott Neil

The only one that did stamina was the shit one,Angel of Darkness!.

darksteel6
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darksteel6

That game was OK, at least there the stamina kind of made sense and didn’t get in the way too often.

SharkyKrunk
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SharkyKrunk

For climbing at least the stamina situation would have been solved by making climb-jumps use the same amount of stamina as slow climbing. That way I can look at a peak, say 1 climb jump = 2 metres + 20% of my stamina bar. Peak is 8 metres high, so this is worthwhile. If not, find a different solution. As always, the answer with these things is never to remove the mechanic, but think of ways to improve it such that it’s still interesting, but doesn’t needlessly waste the players time.

goodbyejojo
Guest
goodbyejojo

never was a zelda fan, but enjoyed it for what it is, my only quibble is that the open world feels a bit empty.

AlexAndThunder
Guest
AlexAndThunder

This hits me hard because I’ve just come off Horizon Zero Dawn where you’re never alone for too long. I think it was designed like that due to Switch limitations though (possibly at least) otherwise potential major lag.

SilentPony
Guest
SilentPony

I honestly think I’m the only person playing Ghost Recond Wildlands…Come on guys, its actually pretty fun!

darksteel6
Guest
darksteel6

I’m playing it too and really enjoying it, it is indeed very fun, and you can climb a mountain whenever you want to and don’t have to worry about any of that weather and stamina bullshit.

bimmyz
Guest
bimmyz

ugh, played the beta with 3 other random people for about 10 mins, felt like a choppy version of tpp, uninstalled it without hesitation.

darksteel6
Guest
darksteel6

I think it’s actually just as good if not better then TPP.

Sned
Guest
Sned

It doesn’t look like a terrible co-op game. I think the main issue for most of us in the comment sections is…. Well….

….we don’t really have friends

darksteel6
Guest
darksteel6

Even without friends it’s pretty goddamn fun in my personal opinion.

Sned
Guest
Sned
I tried playing the beta. So many connection issues, it just didn’t work. So I played some Zelda instead. I was told a couple of days later that the connection issues were fixed. I went on it, and finally managed to test it out. The game just wasn’t engaging. The stealth felt like a poor man’s MGS, the gunplay felt like a poor man’s GTA, and the action sequences felt like a poor man’s JC3. Not to mention that there was still frequent connection issues. So I played some Doom instead. Unless They managed to fix everything since the beta… Read more »
Carter
Guest
Carter

It’s Ubisoft, they generally make poor games dressed in shiny graphics.

darksteel6
Guest
darksteel6

That’s true for the AC series IMO, but I don’t think that’s the case for the Far Cry Series, the Watch Dogs series or Wildalnds.

Carter
Guest
Carter

I loved Far Cry 3, 4 was decent and I’ve played about 2 hours of Primal since I got it, not very good imo.

darksteel6
Guest
darksteel6

Yeah i’m with Total Biscuit on Primal, given how much Jim has been outspoken about how much he’s getting tired of Open World games, i’m really surprised he liked Primal, considering it seems to have every single convention in open-world games that he dislikes.

darksteel6
Guest
darksteel6

I felt like the game combined elements from Just Cause, Far Cry and MGS into a nice tasty combination.

CaitSeith
Guest
CaitSeith

I laughed really hard at the premise when it was presented at Ubisoft’s E3. Besides that, I think I’ll pass this one. I’m not a fan of modern military shooters.

Jonas Håkansson
Guest
Jonas Håkansson

Nice review! Sounds like a flawed but good game, I’ll be sure to pick it up when I get my Switch.

neon tiger
Guest
neon tiger

Finally a review that mirrors what i think, i really don’t see what people are thinking when they say it’s one of the best games ever.

deadlydeadly
Guest
deadlydeadly
red13
Guest
red13

Yeah, this, i just saw this and i just, “Is this fucking real ?” so i checked this man twitter, didn’t disappointed, lol.
Careful jim, the big N might sends their army to laid you off.

Fallen Prime
Guest
Fallen Prime

Jim’s next tweet will be a solemn announcement that he fired himself.

red13
Guest
red13

LOL, thanks you i need this laugh.

Artemiy
Guest
Artemiy

Nah, he’ll just blame Chip.
SHUT UP CHIP!

Mark Davenport
Guest

It’s all very sus.

MG_Salad
Guest
MG_Salad

And this my friends, is why, I thank God for Jim.

Terry
Guest
Terry

To be fair, this guy gave evolve a 9/10.
So, he wasn’t really a good reviewer anyway…

MrSquifler
Guest
MrSquifler

Seriously? He was fired for giving Zelda 7/10? Sheesh, it’s a fucking game.

Fallen Prime
Guest
Fallen Prime

Actually, that was for giving the Switch 7/10.

SEMANTICS!!!!!!!!!

MrSquifler
Guest
MrSquifler

Oh yeah, my bad. Still, that’s so shitty of IGN.

Inspector_Gidget
Guest
Inspector_Gidget

THANK YOU. I picked it up and found that it can’t pull me away from Horizon at the moment. I don’t get the universal raves, but I suspect it requires a healthy dose of Nintendo nostalgia, which I lost a long time ago.

darksteel6
Guest
darksteel6

This feels like a classic case of Bioshock Infinite syndrome, I remember when that game got perfect score after perfect scores for weeks, then after a few months people started to find that the game was actually quite flawed in a number of ways, which made it clearly that many critics were too blinded by their love of the franchise to properly assess the game.

Powermad80
Guest
Powermad80

Or general opinions sway over time. You see this on reddit even. First everyone hated Fallout 4 and wanted it to fail, then it got decent reviews and the people who liked it started dominating the discussion, then later on when the hype from those people died down the negative people started dominating the discussions again.

Carter
Guest
Carter

I don’t care what anyone thinks Infinite is my favourite BioShock game and it’s a 10/10 for me.

SavingPrincess
Guest
SavingPrincess

Infinite was the most overrated game… A linear shooter with a pothead’s college philosophy thesis.

darksteel6
Guest
darksteel6

Indeed it was, I very much agreed with Total Biscuit on that game. It’s hard for a game that’s so focused on mindless shooting to really tell a thought-provoking story.

Carter
Guest
Carter

Seems as though every time someone likes a new title in a long running franchise it has to be ‘nostalgia’, and it’s never anything to do with the fact that we all have different taste in games.

Inspector_Gidget
Guest
Inspector_Gidget

I’m not saying it isn’t a good game. But it seems like Nintendo games in particular get such universal acclaim that there’s no room for someone not liking it. They seem to get a pass in areas others do not because of fondness for the brand.

Carter
Guest
Carter

You argued the opposite though, your argument is that Zelda isn’t really all that good unless you have nostalgia for the series.

Inspector_Gidget
Guest
Inspector_Gidget

Not really. There’s a big gap between “it’s a good game” and “OMG life-changing open world perfection” in every single review. There was no way this game wasn’t getting 10’s across the board unless it was pure trash. Which, admittedly, it’s not.

Carter
Guest
Carter

Those people probably genuinely think that, so let them. Don’t accredit it to nostalgia.

Powermad80
Guest
Powermad80

Have you not heard people’s opinion of Paper Mario Sticker Star, Star Fox Zero, Federation Force, etc.?

Nintendo games often get such high praise because they’re *that* good, and when they aren’t you damn sure hear about it.

Carter
Guest
Carter

Wrong. Impossible. I don’t personally like it so everybody else has nostalgia glasses.

Inspector_Gidget
Guest
Inspector_Gidget

Well, fine. I hit a nerve. Having to rebut every single contrary opinion sort of proves my point. Glad you like it, have fun.

Carter
Guest
Carter

ME 1-0 YOU

EASY

Xirbtt
Guest
Xirbtt

Different strokes. Horizon is a bore of an open world for me. I’d rather play Zelda. 😛

SilentPony
Guest
SilentPony

I seriously can’t tell if these are real comments or satirical ones…

HerbertGW
Guest
HerbertGW

Go to PCMR on Reddit, then look for any thread where anyone says anything remotely bad about Nintendo. Whichever company makes rose tinted glasses these days must solely rely on Nintendo “Fanboys” for profits.

Fallen Prime
Guest
Fallen Prime

Apropos of nothing, “Please Don’t Be Mad At Me Again Reddit” is a contender for the best tag on the site.

Powermad80
Guest
Powermad80

I dunno my money’s on “Contains Skeletons”

Erwin
Guest
Erwin

So, new Zelda is almost as good as Uncharted 4. Nice!

Geebun
Guest
Geebun

Come on! 7, that’s 1.5 less then Uncharted 4. They might as well remove the game from the eshop and stores, it’s unplayable! There’s no way anyone can enjoy it! /s

Jonathan Marvin
Guest
Jonathan Marvin

Breath of the Wild < Rise of the Argonauts

John Cal McCormick
Guest
John Cal McCormick

The bleach comment is amazing. It’s so sad when someone on the internet doesn’t have exactly the same opinion as you, isn’t it?

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