The Sterlist: 5 Reasons Why The TPP Is Gross And Scary For Games

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The Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal is grotesque. Here’s a handy list talking about it.

Also, here’s Tarmack’s excellent (and superior) overview on the matter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0DIJVetzaHs

The TPP leak for your own reading: https://wikileaks.org/tpp-ip3/WikiLea…

Handy links provided by Tarmack:
http://www.exposethetpp.org
http://canadians.org/tpp
http://tppaustralia.org

Erich Fromm Hell
Guest
Man the barricades!!! Seriously, these Richie Rich’s would happily slit your throat in the night if it helped their projections. Yes, I’m a deplorably obvious dissenter, but it’s becoming – if anything – much, much harder at my age to adopt the Churchilian adage on socialism: “If a man is not a socialist by the time he is 20, he has no heart. If he is not a conservative by the time he is 40, he has no brain.” Well, I’ve had the reverse journey. And this TPP deal is just another part of what is becoming an increasingly old… Read more »
ChairmanDrew
Guest
ChairmanDrew

Of course these issues are pretty petty in comparison to the other implications of the TPP, but I applaud your efforts to bring these dodgy deals to attention within your capacity as that of a games journalist. Bravo Jim, bravo.

Chris
Guest
Chris
What scares me most is (to my understanding) is the TPP gives corporation the abilities to take governments to court if the country passes laws that hurt their profits. So let’s say Australia doesn’t like the fact that cigarettes cause lung cancer. We passed plain packaging laws to make them less attractive (no brand get’s a nice looking logo) as well as MASSIVE warning labels with graphic photos of rotting teeth and cancerous lungs. These are laws we currently have in place Now BEFORE the TPP got passed, these laws passed with little problem. Cigarette companies sued, and were crushed… Read more »
SaburoDaimando
Guest
SaburoDaimando

That would be referred to as the Investor-State Dispute Settlement.

Dave Dogge
Guest
Dave Dogge

thanks for this nugget of information, it looks like an agreement for the involved countries to go full monty on DRM for company products (hardware and digital – for internet also)… but I tell you it will just backfire on those companies because it’s not obligatory for all companies. Would be nice if you did a follow up piece on the TTIP for USA and Europe … WTH is going on there.

Commie
Guest
Commie

…thank god for you…

Joe Joeson
Guest
Joe Joeson

I’m actually for the law because it pushes for stricter environmental regulations on countries that don’t enforce them.

I’m okay with giving up some of my freedom to protect the freedom of the things that share this planet with me. Ideally we’d get that protection without the dollarshaped dick in our asses, but silver linings.

kiben007
Guest
kiben007

Ok actually that is a lie. This will NOT help environmental safety regulations. If anything, if any sort of regulation is put in place that affects a company’s profits or expected profits, they can sue, and under the TPP will win and have the regulation repealed. This law will DESTROY environmental safety standards.

Ash
Guest
Ash

my brother told me about this months ago surprised its being brought up now.

Corvid
Guest
Corvid
IP law has been kind of screwy for some time. If you’re a corporation with a legal team, you can get innocent parties quietly nudged off of most of the places they can get seen on the Internet with a sternly worded letter and a withering glare. If you’re a developer with fewer members than fingers on one hand, someone who could be writing code or updating your website gets to send out DMCA notices to the fifty file sharing sites your work is being passed around on and hope the violators of your copyright don’t just glance up from… Read more »
ElektroDragon
Guest
ElektroDragon

So you’re voting for Trump, then, Jim?

Nitrium Oxide
Guest
Nitrium Oxide

So much for sovereignty…

Scott Mclellan
Guest
Scott Mclellan

Sovereignty has been gone to the west and most of europe for decades. ala international banking cartel. that some of the worlds remaining true sovereign countrys are massive problems for the world must just be a coincedence . this is just another nail in the coffin people do not yet realise they are in.

I AM A TENT
Guest
I AM A TENT

The horror, the horror

Brian Seiler
Guest
Brian Seiler
I said it to Tarmack and I’ll say it here – while I don’t necessarily disagree with any of the particular observations you’re making here, you’re giving a somewhat disingenuous impression of the whole situation by focusing only on the costs that you identify without at least attempting to describe what the agreement is actually intended to achieve. The ultimate purpose behind the Trans-Pacific Partnership is to constrain China. Currently, China is allowed to operate basically without any effective countermeasure on the world economic stage. As a result, you’ve got a situation where – for example – Chinese businesses engage… Read more »
09philj
Guest
09philj

I’d rather be free than safe.

Dr Mel
Guest
Dr Mel

The context you’ve put it in here makes a lot more sense than what I’ve been hearing so far, which is a general attitude of “the corporations are doing something creepy! Watch out, sheeple!”

Bear in mind, I’m not casting approval over anything, but what you’ve framed above sounds much more plausible and logical than anything I’ve read thus far on the matter.

tom
Guest
tom
Obama himself admitted to containing the economic growth of China was the main reason for the TTP, and not the intellectual property abuses that sometimes occur in China ( like everywhere else ) that you claim. Your fear campaign, and deliberate omission of the global chessboard game of economic statergy by shit-head leaders ( of which I count all of them, no, I’m not a cultist Libertarian ) is really a counter to the B.R.I.C.S ( Brazil, Russia, Indian, China and South africa – who are teaming up to form their own economic block, so counter the US economic empire… Read more »
Brian Seiler
Guest
Brian Seiler
I’m unsure what you’re so worked up about here. I am quite aware of the fact that the Trans-Pacific Partnership is intended to counterbalance China’s current enthusiastic attempts to set the terms of business for trade throughout the region. I apologize if that was not clear to you from my initial response. However, the section that we’re actually discussing here (and the one that was leaked in the first place) specifically has to do with intellectual property and its protection by the signatories to the agreement. This is a very real and ongoing point of concern that most Western nations… Read more »
tom
Guest
tom
Quote from you: “you’re giving a somewhat disingenuous impression of the whole situation by focusing only on the costs that you identify without at least attempting to describe what the agreement is actually intended to achieve.” The idea that Obamas justification for the TPP was left absent by your reply to Jim, and then criticism him for; disingenuousness, a narrow focus, and what the agreement is intended to achieve, while leaving out Obamas explained in public economic geo-statergy against China, is simply BS. You say your geo-politically aware, but then you should apologise to Jim for pretending you were, and… Read more »
09philj
Guest
09philj

“We have a plan to protect us all from China!”
“Great!”
“We just need to fuck you all up the ass first!”
“What?”
“Bend over.”
“I didn’t ask foROWWW!”
“Scream for me more. MORE SLAVE!”

Dave Dogge
Guest
Dave Dogge

I didn’t know that international patent law doesn’t apply to China ? trade embargoes would put a stop to that as fast as you can say ‘Don’t-Copy-Donald-Duck’.

eBusiness
Guest
eBusiness
I could write walls of text about how dangerous and wrong the us versus them rhetoric is, or I could point out how consumer-facing laws ain’t going to do much against corporate ip infringements. But the simplest thing to point out is that China is not even a party in the TPP, these rules are going to fuck up everyone but the Chinese. The Chinese can go on about their business while the TPP partners argue about who isn’t sodomising their own citizens enough. Sure, opening more trade between other countries might weaken the Chinese economy just a tiny bit.… Read more »
Dr Mel
Guest
Dr Mel

So, I’m not clear on how something outlined in this “trade deal” can constitute an actionable law in, at least, the US. How can I be charged for something that isn’t a crime in this country? Or is it that this deal is encouraging the passing of such laws? Because if it’s the latter, that still has to happen and can still be subject to Judiciary and/or Executive challenges.

Brian Seiler
Guest
Brian Seiler
You’re delving into the fairly complex and intricate topic of international law, which means that most responses are going to get really boring and confusing really fast, but the short answer is that the agreement between the Pacific Rim nations could obligate its signatories to undertake certain internal actions or else face certain costs or penalties. Basically, if the U.S. signed on to the deal and then failed to enact any of the mandated laws within the designated time frame, we could be thrown out of the agreement or suffer trade penalties as a result (the specifics vary wildly depending… Read more »
Dr Mel
Guest
Dr Mel
Those ideas sound appropriate for very large scale events, wherein the government or a large company will be coerced to comply with some kind of trade agreement. Individual infractions would not only be difficult to identify, but hardly worth the time and expense to pursue. The idea that cops will come to your personal home to destroy your computer like the KGB is absurd, it would instantly catapult this whole thing into the spotlight and so far it sounds like it’s trying to be very hush-hush. Nevermind the fact that levying sanctions or penalties on a country like the US… Read more »
Brian Seiler
Guest
Brian Seiler
Well, you’ve got a mix of things here. Another problem that you run into with issues like this – particularly when folks start to demagogue them (Bernie Sanders has this filed away under his list of complaints, for instance, which is not going to help the signal-to-noise ratio) – is that the actual effects of the deal start getting distorted. For instance, this weird clause allowing the police to smash your computer for running a file sharing app. That’s probably not what that language is included for. If I had to guess, I’d say that language is probably included for… Read more »
Dr Mel
Guest
Dr Mel

Well, yours is a comprehensive consideration, to say the least, and I’m inclined to believe it if only for its sobriety above the terse and hysterical thoughts I’ve found elsewhere.

I don’t trust big business, but I trust panic a whole lot less.

09philj
Guest
09philj

It’s never stopped the US before.

Dr Mel
Guest
Dr Mel

If it’s just that easy, then you’d better pack for the nearest uninhabited island.

09philj
Guest
09philj

In which case the CIA will come and get you and take you to Guantanamo Bay. Basically, the US government does whatever the fuck it wants.

Dr Mel
Guest
Dr Mel

lol Then why bother living?!

09philj
Guest
09philj

Because they probably won’t come for me since I’m a white British citizen living in Britain. (And a legal minor for another couple of months…)

Dr Mel
Guest
Dr Mel

Uh oh, you told them too much!

Jecht342 .
Guest
Jecht342 .

I’m not at all an expert on this, but when you pass a trade agreement, you pass it into law. Copyright protections especially would be an area where one country would actually be trying to change the enforcement of laws in another country. I can’t imagine why you’d even bother talking about copyright protections in a trade deal if you weren’t going to change laws in one or more of the countries involved.

Kage
Guest
Kage
You’re close. Basically, in order to comply with the agreement, all signing countries would need to pass laws, and then enforce them, that put them into compliance with the trade agreement. At least, among what is mandatory. Anything optional may as well not exist, as any country choosing not to use an optional tidbit would not be in violation of the trade agreement. This is a trick that is often employed to make the text of a trade treaty appear more balanced. They claim they respected all these concerns regarding consumer rights, but make sure the wording is such that… Read more »
Dr Mel
Guest
Dr Mel
My point was, that if this agreement does end up passing this into law, it still has to be done through the normal channels. It has to go through normal legislation, there’s no mechanic for a law to be created outside of our domestic legal system. And if/when it gets to that point is when the constitutionality of it would become pretty apparent. But as I’ve since realized, this is much more about larger scale examples of copyright and IP protection, as it applies to governments and international business concerns. Your personal involvement in this agreement, if it ever amounts… Read more »
TaraMayB
Guest
TaraMayB

I’m glad you did this video and I can’t agree with you enough here. I hope more people start talking about how creepy and terrifying this whole situation is.

Also, because of the thumbnail, I can’t help but think, when are you going to get a Skeksis mask? Or do you have one already and I’ve forgotten about it. I’d love to see you do an episode of Jimquisition or something dressed up like the Chamberlain.

Magratheian
Guest
Magratheian

Not to be a corporate shill or anything, but it’s arguable that corporations are only really responsible for making money and pleasing their shareholders, and the TTP is just an example of that behaviour. I don’t have enough info to judge on this, but goverments aren’t staffed entirely by inept, morally bankrupt lunatics. Presumably since the TTP and it’s euro equivalent are still here, rather than being hastily denied by all envolved, the goverments see some actual benefit to themselves that is worth dealing with a certain degree of corporate fuckery.

Nitrium Oxide
Guest
Nitrium Oxide
Well it’s the corporations who finance (i.e. bribe) these very governments – they pay for the expensive election campaigns and expect something in return (if denied they’ll just support your rival instead). They also threaten to pull their company HQs out of certain states/countries if the state’s/country’s congressmen/leader doesn’t do as they’re told. Which they are allowed to do all this of course, but only because we let them. We need to stop voting for ANY politician who is on the payroll of corporations (i.e. those that accept campaign money from corporations or powerful individuals connected to corporations). That would… Read more »
Magratheian
Guest
Magratheian
To be honest, that’s a problem of democracy rather than of corruption. Businesses aren’t exempt from the people allowed to have their say in how they desire their country to be governed, and they have, generally, a greater quantity of resources at their disposal than the average voter or pressure group; not to mention that due to the nature of politics, that to achieve significant changes, the politician must get their views across to a significant porition of the population, which, big shock, requires money. It”s just another example of the compromise between ideology and practicality that is the hallmark… Read more »
Fyou
Guest
Fyou

Holy shit, I didn’t realize anyone actually bought into that “businesses are people too, you guys” line. I’m pretty sure the people that put it into law didn’t even believe that horse batter.

Enuo
Guest
Enuo

All the Samurai Warriors footage made it difficult for me to gauge the true extent of the danger here.

Ron Funk
Guest
Ron Funk

Thanks for telling me what game this was. Looked repetitive, but can’t be too bad considering how distracting it was despite my interest in Jim’s subject-matter.

Archmike
Guest
Archmike

I think you missed the most important point here Jim. TTIP allows companies to sue governments if they make laws that would reduce their profit margins. This is liek something out of a dystopian blade runner future thing and it’s happening right now. The whole thng is a fucking disgrace and what’s worse is how fucking defenceless we are to stop it. I have no idea wtf to do to stop this. Petitions etc can just be ignore. Short of out right violent uprising i don’t know what will change this.

Chris N
Guest
Chris N

We stopped SOPA and PIPA with huge amounts of representative lobbying–look at the work the EFF did. https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2015/10/trade-officials-announce-conclusion-tpp-now-real-fight-begins contains their current thoughts on it.

Archmike
Guest
Archmike

Well here’s hoping we can do the same but this seems on a whole different level to me tbh 🙁

Brett Dunbar
Guest
Brett Dunbar
Investor state dispute resolution has existed for decades there are hundreds of treaties that include it already. The consequences are pretty limited as it only really has much effect on states which lack a robust domestic law. TPP uses a long established independent tribunal linked to the World Bank called ICSID. The USA has been the defendant before ICSID on thirteen occasions and has won every time. The future profit provision is fairly limited what it means is that if a state arbitrarily cancels a licence or nationalises an operation you have to be compensated for the value of the… Read more »
Milestone_RP
Guest
Milestone_RP
No, Jim, it’s not the “anti-corporate Liberal” in you that opposes this. This is beyond ideology and party lines. No private individual in ANY country that is involved with this could possibly think this is a good thing, by ANY stretch of the imagination. Hell, in the U.S., just take the whole “Democrats vs Republicans” thing out of it completely, because at this point, we can just assume that ALL of them are out for us with the long knives with corporate backers feeding them cash all the way. And keeping things silent and fast-tracking this kind of crap has… Read more »
SilentPony
Guest
SilentPony

Wait, I thought the TPP was a thinly disguised Chinese encirclement plan?
Looking at the Nations that the deal benefits, it’s basically an economic ring around China.
Essentially keeping the peace by forcing China into a corner where they have no room to expand.

So it’s a hard global political move. Sacrificing the American middle class on the Altar of World Peace.

I guess liking it or not boils down to if you’re American and how patriotic you feel.

09philj
Guest
09philj

Nothing to do with that.

Matt Maglennon
Guest
Matt Maglennon

Just some construct criticism Jim, I didn’t get much from this video other than the TPP is bad and contains some shady stuff. Some elaboration on the actual wording, or terms of the TPP and some possible direct consequences would have been help. Thanks any way though! By the way, my Dad just retired for 35 years teaching at Orpington college, I wonder if you two ever met 😀

Mark Davenport
Guest

The TPP is a state of growing unrest here in Australia.

Of the public that knows about it, hates it almost universally regard of if they vote conservative or progressive.
Yet politically side, the parties, regardless of if they’re conservative or progressive, seem to be right up for it. Although most politicians when questioned haven’t a clue what is in the deal itself.

The deal not only just threatens media, but almost every industry.

Matrim
Guest
Matrim

There were a goodly number of Democrats (and a small handful of Republicans) who were opposed…not nearly enough, though.

rcivit
Guest
rcivit

The fact we don’t see more torches and pitchforks around kinda baffles me.

Chris N
Guest
Chris N
We don’t see more pitchforks and torches because the people who care usually don’t have the audience to make a large number of pitchforks and torches appear. This is why I applauded Jim for talking about it: he has a large audience. He has that potential to make people (who usually may not care about this kind of thing) aware of it and how it affects them. I am hesitant to use the word responsibility (because I have no right to tell Jim what to do), but I really feel that people who have an audience of any respectable size… Read more »
Benj
Guest
Benj

Looking at this it seems really obvious that we need more lawyers who play video games. At the moment the expertise in video games that is being presented when these laws are made are coming entirely from companies.

So many of these things (like banning the whole digging around in game files thing) might seem reasonable to an outside but the actual neagtive and unfair controlling nature of these bans would be immediately obvious to someone who is a games enthusiast.

Chris N
Guest
Chris N

The problem is not that the lawyers don’t exist; the problem is they’re not invited to these meetings. The EFF has lawyers who understand these topics, but in cases like this where everything is kept secret we don’t learn about them until it’s too late.

Chris N
Guest
Chris N

Thank you for this, Jim. Thank you. I already knew about this, but some parts of your audience don’t. They’re the ones who need to hear this. Please bring more politics to your show. You have a huge voice and to use it to inform people is a very noble and honorable thing to do. Thank god for you, Jim Fucking Sterling, Son.

gunsrlove
Guest
gunsrlove

Their constant plots to hold the internet with the firmest grip fill them with determination!

On a side note, I recall Jim mentioning there will be a change in the logo from the usual big J in a circle surrounded by machete blades. Interested in the new aesthetic because reasons.

Jim Sterling
Guest

Nah, that logo stays, I like it too much. But there will be some aesthetic changes revolving around it.